Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

All days
Go back

Friday 14 April 2023 16.30 - 18.30
V-12 SOC12b Social Mobility II
Västra Hamngatan 25 AK2 134
Network: Social Inequality Chair: Joana-Maria Pujadas-Mora
Organizers: - Discussant: Joana-Maria Pujadas-Mora
Joris Kok : Jews, Diamonds, and Occupational Mobility: the Amsterdam Diamond Industry, 1873-1940
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, the Amsterdam diamond industry was one of the largest industries of the city and the largest diamond production centre in the world. Notably, a majority of its workers were Jewish, representing roughly 70 percent of the city’s diamond workers despite Jews making ... (Show more)
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, the Amsterdam diamond industry was one of the largest industries of the city and the largest diamond production centre in the world. Notably, a majority of its workers were Jewish, representing roughly 70 percent of the city’s diamond workers despite Jews making up only 10 percent of the Amsterdam population. Ever since the arrival of the industry in Amsterdam in the beginning of the seventeenth century, the production of polished diamonds was an occupation open to Jews, unlike most other skilled work. At its peak — the first decade of the twentieth century — 30% of Jewish men were employed in, or adjacent, the diamond industry. Thus, the diamond industry clearly stood at the core of the Jewish economic experience. The industry was also home to the first modern union in the Netherlands, the ANDB (General Dutch Diamond Workers’ Union), founded in 1894. As unorganized workers were excluded from working in the factories, the ANDB was able to unionize virtually every diamond worker in Amsterdam by 1900. An extensive membership administration, starting in 1898, kept track of the number of weeks a member spent employed, unemployed, on sick leave or on strike for each year of membership. Combining this career information from the union’s recently digitized membership administration with additional demographic and occupational information from marriage certificates and population registries, full life courses and careers were reconstructed for representative samples of 400 men and 400 women born between 1873 and 1922. Using life course analysis, this paper studies the individual determinants for occupational mobility for Jewish, non-Jewish, male, and female diamond workers, focusing particularly on differences between the two ethno-religious groups. Moreover, results are compared with a representative sample of the Amsterdam population from the Historical Sample of the Netherlands to study the relative importance of working in the diamond industry for Jewish workers. (Show less)

Xizi Luo : Parental Dictates: Marriage Sorting and Social Mobility in Imperial China, 1614-1854
In traditional China, marriage was purely determined by parents. There is a proverb that says one should marry someone with a similar social status. In the context of China, the extent of assortative mating, however, is open to debate, as is its impact on intergenerational mobility. Using a rich dataset ... (Show more)
In traditional China, marriage was purely determined by parents. There is a proverb that says one should marry someone with a similar social status. In the context of China, the extent of assortative mating, however, is open to debate, as is its impact on intergenerational mobility. Using a rich dataset collected from Chinese civil examination papers, this paper finds that marriage was far more assortative than conventionally estimated between the late 17th to the 18th century. Moreover, families with various background utilised different strategies. Though hypergamy was prevalent in traditional China, families at risk of downward mobility tended to choose girls from better families. Finally, using information from the wife’s father and relatives, this research highlights the significant impact of the maternal side on current and future generations’ outcomes. It implies that parentally arranged marriage alliances and maternal support contribute to the perpetuation of a clan. (Show less)

Kees Mandemakers, Joris Kok : Intergenerational Social Mobility of Jews: The Netherlands, 1812-1922
Recent studies on intergenerational mobility have focused on using large datasets to examine trends in intergenerational status attainment for entire countries. As a result, differential experiences of minority subgroups are overlooked. Using a multi-generational linked dataset of Dutch marriage certificates—LINKS—this study describes and compares the social mobility trajectories of Ashkenazi ... (Show more)
Recent studies on intergenerational mobility have focused on using large datasets to examine trends in intergenerational status attainment for entire countries. As a result, differential experiences of minority subgroups are overlooked. Using a multi-generational linked dataset of Dutch marriage certificates—LINKS—this study describes and compares the social mobility trajectories of Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews in the Netherlands during industrialization and modernization. Distinctively Jewish Names are derived from the index of the 1851-53 Amsterdam Population Register, which contains information on the names and religious affiliation of all inhabitants of Amsterdam around the midway point of the nineteenth century. As Amsterdam was the home of half of all Dutch Jews at that time, this source is an excellent tool for deriving the Jewishness of individual names. Intergenerational status transmission is studied by linking marriage certificates of grooms with those of their father’s and their grandfather’s marriages. Multilevel regression models will be used to study intergenerational social mobility at the national and city-level in order to examine whether certain cities provided greater opportunities for upward mobility among their respective Jewish populations. (Show less)

Vlad Popovici, Vera Slovakova : Social Mobility of Members of Parliament in Bohemia and Transylvania in the Late Habsburg Monarchy
The aim of this paper is to compare social mobility of the political elites (i.e., members of Parliament) in two provinces of the Habsburg Monarchy (Bohemia and Transylvania) over three generations (mid-nineteenth to early twentieth centuries). The topic has hardly been dealt with for the late Habsburg Monarchy, even less ... (Show more)
The aim of this paper is to compare social mobility of the political elites (i.e., members of Parliament) in two provinces of the Habsburg Monarchy (Bohemia and Transylvania) over three generations (mid-nineteenth to early twentieth centuries). The topic has hardly been dealt with for the late Habsburg Monarchy, even less so in a cross-provincial comparative perspective. The research is based on two datasets hosting information on deputies and their family members, compiled from a variety of sources, ranging from parish registers and censuses, to university registries, funeral notices and newspaper announcements of vital events. The analysis is rooted in the HISCO, HISCLASS and HISCAM models, and its aim is twofold. On the one hand, it aims at answering a series of research questions focusing on the inter- and intragenerational social mobility of the members of Parliament, following an analysis of the professional titles of the deputies (before and after holding the seat) and of their close male relatives (fathers, fathers-in-law, brothers, sons, sons-in-law). On the other hand, it aims at underlining the methodological difficulties encountered when applying the HISCO-based models to upper social echelons, but also to the historical realities of East-Central Europe. (Show less)



Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer