Preliminary Programme

Wed 18 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 08.30 - 10.30
V-1 MAT11 Handling Shortage during World War II. Coping Strategies and Survival Practices under (German) Occupation
Matthias de Vrieshof 2, 002
Network: Material and Consumer Culture Chair: Elizabeth Harvey
Organizer: Tatjana Tönsmeyer Discussant: Elizabeth Harvey
Paolo Fonzi : Famine, Food Chains and Survival Strategies in Greece during the Second World War
The paper by Dr. Paolo Fonzi will focus on Greece to analyze the changes in the regimes of supply with refer-ence to the Italian occupation area - that comprised almost 2/3 of the country up to September 1943 - and, for the sake of comparison, to the German occupation area ... (Show more)
The paper by Dr. Paolo Fonzi will focus on Greece to analyze the changes in the regimes of supply with refer-ence to the Italian occupation area - that comprised almost 2/3 of the country up to September 1943 - and, for the sake of comparison, to the German occupation area in the same period. It will show that the policies of the occupying powers were tightly linked to these changes, not only in that the occupiers tried to influence the reorganization of the food production and supply chains to their own advantage, but also in their unintended effects. In this regard, the paper can be understood as a contribution to the methodological discussion on how to approach occupation as a social phenomenon and, in particular, to what degree occupied societies can be understood as "occupier-driven". (Show less)

Jerzy Kochanowski : Survival Strategies of Polish Intelligentsia under German Occupation 1939-1945
The paper by Dr. Jerzy Kochanowski (professor at Warsaw Universi-ty/Poland) will be on occupied Poland. It starts from the assessment that not so much resistance and armed combat but everyday struggle was the main concern of the majority of the Polish population in the General Government during the war years. ... (Show more)
The paper by Dr. Jerzy Kochanowski (professor at Warsaw Universi-ty/Poland) will be on occupied Poland. It starts from the assessment that not so much resistance and armed combat but everyday struggle was the main concern of the majority of the Polish population in the General Government during the war years. This is shown by a close reading of the diaries of members of the Polish intelligentsia. The paper analyses their strategies of survival as metic-ulously planned actions that were based on scrupulous assessments of given situations and adjustment to changing circumstances. Special attention will be given among other things to strategies such as setting up (small) businesses outside their former professions, going into commerce (often black-marketeering) or, in the case of Polish estate owners, establishing forms of partnerships with members of the occupiers’ caste. (Show less)

Karl Christian Lammers : Shortage and State Regulation in Denmark
The paper by Dr. Karl-Christian Lammers (prof. emerit. at Copenhagen University/Denmark) will address Denmark. Though Denmark was “peacefully occupied” – as the German wording of the day put it – and internal sovereignty was promised to Danish authorities, shortages – though to a lesser degree compared with other occupied societies ... (Show more)
The paper by Dr. Karl-Christian Lammers (prof. emerit. at Copenhagen University/Denmark) will address Denmark. Though Denmark was “peacefully occupied” – as the German wording of the day put it – and internal sovereignty was promised to Danish authorities, shortages – though to a lesser degree compared with other occupied societies – were nevertheless felt by the Danes, too. The paper therefore addresses policy strategies by Danish authorities to counter the given situation by introducing rationing of food and every-day commodities, as well as obligations to deliver bread grain to state authorities and to ac-cept substitutes as lower quality products. The paper goes on to show that though the Dan-ish authorities intended to share out the shortage among all social groups, some were nev-ertheless better off because they had access to black markets and especially because they were producers of food who could sell and export agrarian food products at higher prices to the Germans and Germany. These coping strategies were beyond the reach of “normal” consumers. (Show less)

Tatjana Tönsmeyer : Hunger, Malnutrition, Shortage – Survival Strategies of Jews and Non-Jews as Members of Occu-pied Societies during World War II. A European Perspective
While, generally speaking, most people living under occupation during World War II had to fight scarcity, Jews within these occupied societies were in a special position. This is ex-plored in the paper by Dr. Tatjana Tönsmeyer (professor at Wuppertal Universi-ty/Germany). The Jewish populations all over occupied Europe were usually hit ... (Show more)
While, generally speaking, most people living under occupation during World War II had to fight scarcity, Jews within these occupied societies were in a special position. This is ex-plored in the paper by Dr. Tatjana Tönsmeyer (professor at Wuppertal Universi-ty/Germany). The Jewish populations all over occupied Europe were usually hit harder by scarcity, for instance because their rations were smaller (as all over Eastern Europe), be-cause they had less to barter with as a result of policies to expropriate their property or be-cause they were more vulnerable to denunciation on the black markets. Furthermore, at the time of the deportations and the mass killings, going into hiding meant finding people who were willing to feed them in times where provisions were often scarce and supplies were therefore closely monitored within neighbourhoods, whether urban or rural. The paper therefore addresses shortage as a transnational Jewish experience and draws attention to the fact that being occupied generally meant that people not only lost their everyday rou-tines but also their mental bearings: assumptions they had held as self-evident no longer applied and they often no longer knew whom they could trust. This can be illustrated in the context of supply generally and be understood as the context which radically affected the survival strategies for Jewish members of occupied societies. (Show less)



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