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Wed 18 March
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
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    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 08.30 - 10.30
R-1 ORA02 Oral Histories of Imprisonment and Camp Life
Lipsius, 307
Network: Oral History Chair: Susan Lindholm
Organizer: David Beorlegui Discussants: -
David Beorlegui : “Those Years Marked our Lives, didn’t they?” Memory, Experience and Emotions in Life Story Interviews with Political Prisoners in the Basque Country (1968-1982)
The entrance of a new generation of activists into the political struggle around 1968 provoked a considerable alarm among the Francoist authorities in Spain. From 1969 to 1975, several states of emergency were declared in the country from the first time by the dictatorial regime of Franco and thousands of ... (Show more)
The entrance of a new generation of activists into the political struggle around 1968 provoked a considerable alarm among the Francoist authorities in Spain. From 1969 to 1975, several states of emergency were declared in the country from the first time by the dictatorial regime of Franco and thousands of young activists were sent to prison. Despite the amnesty granted to political prisoners in 1977 by the new government elected after Franco's death, the situation was very harsh in the Basque country due to the high level of mobilizations and political violence in the region. This meant that the framework of exceptionality and repression remained implemented to a large extent.
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This paper explores the Radical History of the period 1968-1982 in Spain from the perspective of the memories of the Basque Country’s political prisoners. It focuses on those memories that could be described as “vivid”, “faithful”, “lively”, or “intense”, since they create a living connection to the past that seems to be felt in the body and enables to see and bring to the present what is not there, but still affects them. Drawing on the theories of affect and emotion I will argue that the affective practices that emerge during the process of remembering qualify and shape experience, giving texture and meaning to their past in prison. (Show less)

Olatz Dañobeitia Ceballos : Resisters: from Comrades to Sisters in a Prison Context
This presentation takes the life-stories of six women as a starting point. All of them were imprisoned in different facilities in the Spanish State during the 2000s. The specific characteristics, the functions and contexts that made possible their relationships are analyzed to conclude that these women have overcome the limits ... (Show more)
This presentation takes the life-stories of six women as a starting point. All of them were imprisoned in different facilities in the Spanish State during the 2000s. The specific characteristics, the functions and contexts that made possible their relationships are analyzed to conclude that these women have overcome the limits of what is understood to be a “comrade” and develop relationships that could be considered a form of kinship.
However, I will try to stay away from the normative straight view prevalent in kinship studies. I will consider how they have become sisters through mutual care and support, helping each other in the economic, moral, psychological, physical and political dimensions of imprisonment. Finally, I state that this form of engagement has been a key aspect to their resistance and self-growth in a context that imposes extreme vulnerability and denies power and autonomy to subjects. (Show less)

Irina Mukhina : Soviet Prison Architecture: Past or Present?
Some eighty years after the height of the Great Terror, the physical spaces of the former GULAG compounds are being re-conceptualized by those who encounter them on a daily basis. These spaces are now vested with memories and histories of their own, oftentimes remarkably distant from their original purposes. My ... (Show more)
Some eighty years after the height of the Great Terror, the physical spaces of the former GULAG compounds are being re-conceptualized by those who encounter them on a daily basis. These spaces are now vested with memories and histories of their own, oftentimes remarkably distant from their original purposes. My field research in Yakutia (near Vitim, Olyokminsk, Lensk, and Ust’-Kut, to name a few) and the Perm krai (in Krasnovishersk, Solikamsk, Cherdyn, Sim, Nyrob and Surmog among others) demonstrates this complexity. While some former camps only exist as ruins and others are used as prisons to the present day (and at least one, Perm-36, has been turned into a museum), many others became objects of desire and admiration, turning them into prime real estate. Structures erected by former special settlers are especially sought after for their craftsmanship, conveniences and size, but even barracks have acquired a new life. As such, my presentation will address the complexity of retaining Gulag memories in light of new public uses of structures associated with the experience. While relying on a broad body of scholarship on the interrelation of space and memory, the paper will also present a rich array of visual and oral history sources to demonstrate how pockets of memory appear when people choose to selectively dissociate the physical space from its prior meaning. (Show less)



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