Preliminary Programme

Wed 18 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 11.00 - 13.00
U-2 HEA02 ‘Primary Health Care’ in Post-War Global Health: Making and Meaning
Reuvensplaats 4, 201A
Network: Health and Environment Chairs: -
Organizer: Martin Gorsky Discussants: -
David Bannister : ´Into the Hitherto untouched Periphery’: Planning, Primary Health Care and Changing Idioms of Health Governance in Ghana, 1957-1996
This paper traces the trajectory of Primary Health Care (PHC) – under various names and varied reimaginings by successive cohorts of health officials – as an idea shaping both domestic planning and the relationship of Ghana’s health system to the world of ‘international health’. The discussion covers the period from ... (Show more)
This paper traces the trajectory of Primary Health Care (PHC) – under various names and varied reimaginings by successive cohorts of health officials – as an idea shaping both domestic planning and the relationship of Ghana’s health system to the world of ‘international health’. The discussion covers the period from 1957-1996, through independence, decades of rapid political change, the turn to structural adjustment, and Ghana’s return to multi-party democracy in 1996. The paper notes the singular role played by the WHO in assuming authority for health planning after 1966, following the overthrow of the first independent African government. It examines how this role was progressively eroded from the late 1970s, by the rise of alternative international health actors and the simultaneous reassertion of an uneven domestic sovereignty for healthcare decision-making. It asks what these developments have meant for the subsequent evolution of Ghana’s national health services. (Show less)

Hayley Brown : The Establishment of Health Centres in New Zealand from the 1970s
This paper explores attempts in New Zealand to improve the provision of primary health care from the 1970s. From 1941 visits to general practitioners were subsidised by the government, with patients originally paying for approximately 25 per cent of the cost of the visit. Over time this benefit decreased in ... (Show more)
This paper explores attempts in New Zealand to improve the provision of primary health care from the 1970s. From 1941 visits to general practitioners were subsidised by the government, with patients originally paying for approximately 25 per cent of the cost of the visit. Over time this benefit decreased in real terms making access to basic primary care more restrictive. In the early 1970s government funding was provided to establish health centres around New Zealand which were designed on the British model of combining group practice with other areas of primary health care such as social work, dentistry and counselling. A further addition was made to the concept of health centres in 1986 when the Labour government agreed to provide funding for 11 union-sponsored centres which provided low-cost GP visits at a time of rising unemployment. The NZMA was unsupportive of both of these measures. Through exploring the history of these centres, this paper questions to what extent the centres were successful in addressing issues of equity of access to primary health care and expanding the definition of primary health care beyond general practitioners. (Show less)

John Manton : Fashioning Primary Health Care in Post-Independence Nigeria
This paper focuses on attempts to consolidate the organisation, reach, and scope of primary health services in independent Nigeria after 1960, examining how developing modes of planning in international public health were articulated locally amid the politics of health care, regionalisation, and state and economic planning in Nigeria. Specifically, ... (Show more)
This paper focuses on attempts to consolidate the organisation, reach, and scope of primary health services in independent Nigeria after 1960, examining how developing modes of planning in international public health were articulated locally amid the politics of health care, regionalisation, and state and economic planning in Nigeria. Specifically, it examines how need and coverage, quality and reach were framed and assessed amid the shifting global and local politics of disease control, sanitary organisation, health financing, training, and the diversification of health and medical services in relation to the strengthening of developing world health services. Leading up to the publication of ‘The National Health Policy and Strategy to Achieve Health for all Nigerians’ in 1988, it offers a system-wide perspective on medicine, health, equity, and coverage in Nigeria, as these were formulated in relation to indigenous and international concerns with community health and primary health care. (Show less)

Erica Nelson : Colombia: Searching for Health Systems in the Valle del Cauca, 1957-1978
This presentation explores a dynamic assemblage of health systems thinkers and policy shapers that converged in the department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia, towards the end of the 1960s. The paper begins with the establishment of a ‘community medicine programme’ in the rural town of Candelaria in 1957 and ends ... (Show more)
This presentation explores a dynamic assemblage of health systems thinkers and policy shapers that converged in the department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia, towards the end of the 1960s. The paper begins with the establishment of a ‘community medicine programme’ in the rural town of Candelaria in 1957 and ends with the declaration of Alma Ata in Almaty, Kazakstan, in 1978. It draws connections between innovations in health education and health service delivery, trialed and tested by the newly created University del Valle medical school, and the core principles of PHC set forth two decades later. Specifically, the paper details the inner workings of a set of nested projects (COLINPLAS, CIMDER, PRIMOPS and PRIDES) that brought together transnational groups of systems researchers, public health professionals, development economists and health policy makers, while at the same time reinforcing a particularly Cali-centric view of health systems change. (Show less)



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