Preliminary Programme

Wed 18 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 11.00 - 13.00
Z-2 ETH01 “See what is missing from my Letter…”: Letter Writing Practices in Ukrainian Canadian Community (Late 19th - Early 20th Century)
Van Wijkplaats 4, 004
Networks: Ethnicity and Migration , Theory Chair: Jelena Pogosjan
Organizer: Nataliya Bezborodova Discussant: Maryna Chernyavska
Terje Anepaio : Let our Stories be in the Museum, too! Collecting Memories of Russian Speaking Miners in Estonia
In October 2016, the Estonian National Museum opened a core exhibition on the history of Estonian culture in its newly completed exhibition building. The exhibition titled ’Encounters’ introduced several new topics as well as novel approaches, which highlight the points of contact between different social groups in Estonia, and stress ... (Show more)
In October 2016, the Estonian National Museum opened a core exhibition on the history of Estonian culture in its newly completed exhibition building. The exhibition titled ’Encounters’ introduced several new topics as well as novel approaches, which highlight the points of contact between different social groups in Estonia, and stress the importance of tolerance and equality. With this approach the ENM critically acknowledged its previous rootedness in the ideology of ethnical nationalism which have resulted in exclusion of Estonian Russian minority from the museum. In creating the new core exhibition, the ENM aimed at facilitating the invitation of the Russian-speaking community to the museum.
This paper reflects on the process and outcomes of the participatory approach of the ENM from a curator’s perspective. In the focus of the paper will be one of the themed exhibitions of ‘Encounters’ that used oral histories and life stories exclusively to display diverse life trajectories connected with Estonia during the Cold War. The themed exhibition ‘Parallel Worlds. Parallel Lives’ aimed at showing different narratives of life experience in order to reconcile different, often oppositional historical narratives in contemporary Estonia. The goal was to include the voices of Russian-speaking people in the story of Estonian cultural history and to create a dialogue between the two Estonian language groups.
First, this paper gives an outline of the complex process of preparing the oral history exhibition and gaining the recognition of the Russian speaking community – namely, of the former oil shale miners from North Estonia.
Second, the paper reflects on conducting oral histories within this community with a particular focus on bringing forth memories incompatible with the current Estonian national narrative. (Show less)

Nataliya Bezborodova : "K" for "Confiscated": Letters from and to Ukrainian Immigrants in KGB Archives (1930-1950)
Throughout the 20th century, a posted letter remained the main medium in bridging distances between Ukrainians in the Old Country and in diaspora. Letters of a private nature do not directly represent such important events as mass immigration, World War I and II experiences, the Cold War, etc., but they ... (Show more)
Throughout the 20th century, a posted letter remained the main medium in bridging distances between Ukrainians in the Old Country and in diaspora. Letters of a private nature do not directly represent such important events as mass immigration, World War I and II experiences, the Cold War, etc., but they provide important contextual details of that time in the intersection of private life and institutional norms and regulations. Letters collected in the former KGB archives during summer of 2018 in Ukraine shed some light on the obstacles that Ukrainian migrants in North America faced in their efforts to keep ties with their families in Ukraine during soviet regime and the Cold War circumstances. The collected materials include private letters, soviet legal regulations on creation special entities for external correspondence censorship, their duties and annual/monthly reports about the performed work. (Show less)

Tatiana Saburova : Family Photographs and a Family of Photographers: the Gushul Photo Studio
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries photography transformed the way identities were created and memories preserved. Family photographs became means of visual storytelling and autobiographical narrative. Photography as a cultural practice of modern society influenced how young couples and families pictured themselves.

Due to technological developments in the twentieth ... (Show more)
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries photography transformed the way identities were created and memories preserved. Family photographs became means of visual storytelling and autobiographical narrative. Photography as a cultural practice of modern society influenced how young couples and families pictured themselves.

Due to technological developments in the twentieth century, photographs became affordable and popular, allowing commercial and amateur photography to become a part of daily life. There were photo studios even in small towns, offering “cabinet” and “visit” portraits, wedding and funeral shots, and images picturing all events in the life of local communities. A professional or amateur photographer with a Kodak camera took pictures to tell stories about love, happiness, or grief. Textbooks and instructions on photography were advertised in newspapers – “Everybody can be a photographer” – you just needed to order such a book and it would be delivered to your post office.

According to Marianne Hirsch, “photographs locate themselves precisely in the space of contradiction between the myth of the ideal family and the lived reality of family life.” Gushuls’s photos were found in many family albums in Alberta. Thomas Gushul’s obituary in the Coleman Journal said: “He will long be remembered for his portrait work which became a tradition with many families who had their fourth generation recorded by him.” Family photos could be called letters from the past, taken and addressed to ourselves in the future, like diaries; and to our descendants, they connect, like memoirs, generations or families apart. (Show less)

Larisa Sembaliuk Cheladyn : Vuiko Shtif Writes Home
In 1911, at the age of 20, Jacob Maydanyk immigrated to Canada from Svydova, in what is now Western Ukraine. By day he was an iconographer and ran the Providence Church Goods Store in Winnipeg, Manitoba. By night he was a cartoonist. His figures-of-fun, Vuiko Shtif Tabachniuk (Uncle Steve Tobacco) ... (Show more)
In 1911, at the age of 20, Jacob Maydanyk immigrated to Canada from Svydova, in what is now Western Ukraine. By day he was an iconographer and ran the Providence Church Goods Store in Winnipeg, Manitoba. By night he was a cartoonist. His figures-of-fun, Vuiko Shtif Tabachniuk (Uncle Steve Tobacco) and Nasha Meri (Our Mary), satirized early immigrant life in Canada. They appeared regularly between 1914 and 1930 in The News, Canadian Farmer, and other Ukrainian language newspapers and almanacs distributed across Canada. Of note are three letters between Vuiko Shtif in Canada, and his wife Iavdokha, who was still in Ukraine with their children awaiting confirmation that the time was right for them to join him. Maydanyk penned these three fictitious letters to paint a humorous, yet realistic picture, of what it was like to correspond with family during the early years of immigration when customs and language were rapidly changing.

There are many reasons why immigrants choose to leave their home countries, including economic issues, political issues, family reunification, and natural disasters. In general, no matter what the reasoning is, immigrants move to another country to improve their life. However, immigration presents both benefits and challenges for newcomers. One of the major barriers to a smooth transition is language. Misunderstandings and confusion are common difficulties that new Canadians have had to overcome. In addition, foreign accents and cultural quirks can precipitate discrimination and racial intolerance, particularly when job hunting or trying to fit into the local community. For many newcomers, it is easier to just try and blend in as “typical Canadians.” (Show less)

Baris Ülker : Postcards and Mobilities in Exile
As liminal objects between public sphere and privacy, postcards shape the conditions of mobility. Who are the people sending postcards? For what purposes do they send postcards? What kinds of places are depicted through these postcards? How do these images and texts communicate through borders? This paper aims to uncover ... (Show more)
As liminal objects between public sphere and privacy, postcards shape the conditions of mobility. Who are the people sending postcards? For what purposes do they send postcards? What kinds of places are depicted through these postcards? How do these images and texts communicate through borders? This paper aims to uncover these questions relying on the postcards that were received and sent by Ernst Reuter during his exile in Turkey (1935 – 1946). Within this limited period of time, Reuter not only contributed to a body of knowledge on urbanization through articles, reports and books, but also made a considerable visual report of the existing conditions in Turkey through his camera and postcards. This visual aspect has been largely omitted in the scholarship. Burcu Dogramaci’s book (Fotografieren und Forschen: Wissenschafliche Expeditionen mit der Kamera im türkischen Exil nach 1933), while shedding light extensively on the photographs of other German intellectuals in Turkey, gives only a couple of examples from Reuter’s photographs. Therefore, relying on the collections of the Landesarchiv Berlin, the paper explores Ernst Reuter’s postcards through the concept of mobilities in urban studies. The mobilities approach does not consider places as natural containers of socio-spatial processes and inevitable outcomes of free-flowing movements in the global world. Rather, this approach questions the spatial boundaries like global north / global south, urban / rural and Occident / Orient. Connections emerge as the most crucial element of analysis. As Sheller and Urry appropriately put it, “all places are tied into at least networks of connections that stretch beyond each...and mean that nowhere can be an ‘island’” (2006, 209). Rejecting a diachronic study of one site, the paper will present Reuter’s postcards related to excursions with his students, daily family tours, site visits as an expert and holidays. To go beyond the traditional interpretation of postcards as touristic presentations, the paper will also discuss Reuter’s comparative understanding of urbanization. (Show less)



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