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Wed 18 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 14.00 - 16.00
K-3 AFR01a Labour Movements and Workers Organisations: Historical Trajectories and Current Challenges in and from the Global South I
Johan Huizinga, 026
Network: Africa Chairs: -
Organizer: Stefano Bellucci Discussants: -
Samuel Andreas Admasie : Workers’ Agency and Wages in Ethiopia
While developmental projects have been espoused by all Ethiopian governments throughout the last half-century and more, the role and position of labour within this project has been the subject of sharp revisions. In recent times, both the position of labour and the agency of workers in shaping the developmental project ... (Show more)
While developmental projects have been espoused by all Ethiopian governments throughout the last half-century and more, the role and position of labour within this project has been the subject of sharp revisions. In recent times, both the position of labour and the agency of workers in shaping the developmental project has been reduced to that of a mere factor of production. In academia too, most of what recent attention to labour that has been forthcoming has been focused on productivity levels. By measuring the effect that workers’ struggles have had on the position of Ethiopian labour, this paper aims to reframe a discussion on the agency of workers in shaping the political economy and its own position within it.
The paper aims to interrogate the relationship between the agency of Ethiopian wage workers - exercised through the labour movement, and conditioned by its strategic orientation - and the shifting position of labour within the Ethiopian political economy over the past half-century. The paper will zoom in on a number of recent strikes in the industrial belt in the outskirts of Addis Ababa in order to examine the manner in which particular strikes emerge and are resolved, and the impact of such particularities on the aggregate wage movement. (Show less)

Stefano Bellucci : Facing Decent Work: African Regional and International Labour Organisations
ND

Sarah Kunkel : Modernising the Village: Decolonisation and Mechanisation in Ghana under Nkrumah
After the successful fight for political independence, Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah, mobilised the young nation to fight for economic independence through industrialisation. The Volta River Dam and Tema Port were the biggest projects and soon became symbols of Ghana’s development. However, modernisation and mechanisation did not only take place ... (Show more)
After the successful fight for political independence, Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah, mobilised the young nation to fight for economic independence through industrialisation. The Volta River Dam and Tema Port were the biggest projects and soon became symbols of Ghana’s development. However, modernisation and mechanisation did not only take place in urban industrial areas. Nkrumah also had a strong focus on modernising agricultural production and introduced large-scale farms in rural areas in the 1960s that made use of scientific and mechanised methods. This agricultural development brought modernisation to rural areas. State farms and cooperatives transformed peasant farmers into agricultural workers and created opportunities for illiterate people in semi-skilled or skilled positions.
This paper explores the social and cultural impact of agricultural mechanisation. How did the mechanisation of agriculture change the meaning and image of farming in rural communities? The profession of tractor driver is particularly interesting in this respect. What did it mean for men and women to be tractor drivers?
The mechanisation of agriculture also occurred during non-alignment, and Nkrumah collaborated with the West and the East, bringing experts and technology in from both. Yet, most agricultural experts working on the farms came from the East, leading to a shift from a colonial to a more socialist mentality in rural areas, which reshaped the experience of the population with foreigners.
The paper is based on archival sources, newspapers and journals, as well as oral history, and will contribute new insights into the postcolonial history of Ghana and its agriculture besides cocoa farming. (Show less)

Jonathan London : Double Movements or False Optimism: Labor, Welfare, and Societal Transformations in Marketizing East Asia
The accelerated expansion of the world market that has unfolded over the course of the last four decades has transformed social life everywhere, nowhere more than in East Asia, a vast and impressively diverse region that is home to well over two billion people and which has figured centrally not ... (Show more)
The accelerated expansion of the world market that has unfolded over the course of the last four decades has transformed social life everywhere, nowhere more than in East Asia, a vast and impressively diverse region that is home to well over two billion people and which has figured centrally not only in globalizing processes of capital accumulation and divisions of labor on which it depends. Addressing current debates on marketization, class analysis, and labor this paper explores patterns how processes of societal transformation in East Asia have influenced the livelihoods and welfare of the region’s populations, with a special focus on plight and interests of large and diverse ranks of the region’s “laboring classes.” Drawing on an approach that construes countries in the contemporary world economy as globally embedded social orders, the paper proposes theoretical methods for understanding and explaining the trajectories of social transformation and workers struggles across the region. Addressing theoretical debates, the paper questions whether the rapid expansion of social policies in East Asia are rightly seen as a basis for varieties of Polanyian optimism or a more pessimistic Gramscian analysis that views social policy expansion as a false, ideologically laden, divisive package of measures that promise to destroy the foundations on which a labor-friendly counter-movement could be constructed. (Show less)

Eric Otenyo : The Kenyan Labour Movement facing the Decent Work Agenda
ND



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