Preliminary Programme

Wed 18 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 14.00 - 16.00
F-3 WOM07 Teachers on the Move: Transnational and Mediterranean Conversations about Women, Education and Feminism (Late-18th Century and 19th Centuries)
P.N. van Eyckhof 3, 002
Network: Women and Gender Chair: Christina de Bellaigue
Organizer: Rebecca Rogers Discussant: Christina de Bellaigue
Marilyn Booth : Féminisme in Egypt: the Egyptian University’s Women’s Lectures, 1909-12
In 1909, Adolphine Couvreur was invited to deliver French-language lectures on women’s history to women at the newly-established Egyptian University. A teacher at Lycée Racine (Paris), Couvreur was a beneficiary of French feminists’ work to expand female education. Her Cairo lectures exemplify elite networks that both spanned and constituted ‘East/West’ ... (Show more)
In 1909, Adolphine Couvreur was invited to deliver French-language lectures on women’s history to women at the newly-established Egyptian University. A teacher at Lycée Racine (Paris), Couvreur was a beneficiary of French feminists’ work to expand female education. Her Cairo lectures exemplify elite networks that both spanned and constituted ‘East/West’ as distinct imagined spaces modulated by gender ideologies. Aware of concepts Couvreur dissected, such as féminisme, her elite female listeners were also conscious of Egypt’s vast needs in female education. Journalist Labiba Hashim attended Couvreur’s first lecture and criticised the university board’s decision to offer French-language lectures, as useless to most women in Egypt. She contrasted the tiny audience with the ‘waves of women’ attending an Arabic-language speech by teacher/writer Malak ?ifni Nasif. I analyse Couvreur’s lectures (published in Egypt 1910) and local responses in the context of gendered education politics in Egypt and transnationally, and as histoire croisée obstructed: thinking feminism through European idioms rather than as coevally produced across locales. Educator Nabawiyya Musa’s lectures (1912, in Arabic), in contrast, criticized male writers for deleting women’s histories from ‘translations’ of European works, and countered Couvreur’s Eurocentric focus. (Show less)

Caroline Fayolle : Education, Emancipation and Feminism during the French Revolution
The notion of emancipation fueled conflicting interpretations during the French Revolution. This paper will review competing viewpoints on emancipation by analyzing the notion from the perspective of foreign feminist teachers involved in the revolutionary process: the Dutchwoman Etta Palm d’Aelders and the Englishwoman Mary Wollstonecraft. Each of them blazed a ... (Show more)
The notion of emancipation fueled conflicting interpretations during the French Revolution. This paper will review competing viewpoints on emancipation by analyzing the notion from the perspective of foreign feminist teachers involved in the revolutionary process: the Dutchwoman Etta Palm d’Aelders and the Englishwoman Mary Wollstonecraft. Each of them blazed a trail meant to fulfill the Revolution’s emancipatory promise for women. Establishing progressive education for both sexes, and putting struggles against other forms of oppression into words were just some of the means they employed to bring about real equality. Examining the social and political trajectories of these women will demonstrate how their dual experience of exclusion as women and as foreigners enabled them to pinpoint contradictions in the political and pedagogical project defended by revolutionary leaders. (Show less)

Isabelle Matamoros : Migration as Emancipation? Following two French Teachers in Europe (1830s-1840s)
In this paper, I will trace the careers and writings of two teachers who left France for another European country during the July Monarchy: Justine Guillery (1789-1846) and Henriette Renan (1811-1861). Both were both teacher aides in girls’ boarding school in Paris prior to leaving France. Poor and unhappy, they ... (Show more)
In this paper, I will trace the careers and writings of two teachers who left France for another European country during the July Monarchy: Justine Guillery (1789-1846) and Henriette Renan (1811-1861). Both were both teacher aides in girls’ boarding school in Paris prior to leaving France. Poor and unhappy, they chose to leave France to teach abroad, one in Belgium, the other in Poland. There, they managed to study, meet intellectuals, discover new forms of knowledge with fewer restrictions than in France. In this migratory context, they wrote their « souvenirs » and letters. The paper seeks to measure the impact of migration on learned women’s autonomy and their questioning of gendered norms about women and knowledge in the country of departure as well as in their new homes. (Show less)

Rebecca Rogers : Tracking Gendered Pedagogies of Emancipation in Europe and North Africa: Schools, Teachers, and Texts (1830s-1850s)
Socialist movements in the first half of the 19th century brought to the fore demands for better schools and training for women that would contribute to the emancipation of women. These demands found expression in journals and petitions, as well as within institutions that emerged in France and Belgium on ... (Show more)
Socialist movements in the first half of the 19th century brought to the fore demands for better schools and training for women that would contribute to the emancipation of women. These demands found expression in journals and petitions, as well as within institutions that emerged in France and Belgium on one side of the Mediterranean, in Egypt and Algeria, on the other. This paper begins by examining the writings, private journal and initiatives of a French saint-simonian teacher, Joséphine Bachellery, who drew on the radical pedagogy of Joseph Jacotot to advocate girls’ education. It then considers the connections between her ideas and those of other figures in the socialist movements in France and Belgium and their spread to northern Africa, tracing individual figures, their writings, and their educational initiatives. The aim here is to highlight how concern about girls’ education nourished a variety of radical educational endeavors beyond national borders. (Show less)



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