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Wed 18 March
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    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
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Fri 20 March
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Sat 21 March
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Wednesday 18 March 2020 16.30 - 18.30
O-4 ELI04 Elites and Emotions 1600-1900
Lipsius, 147
Network: Elites and Forerunners Chairs: -
Organizer: Mark Rothery Discussants: -
Katie Barclay : Emotional Economies, Illegitimate Intimacies and Gilbert Innes of Stowe
Gilbert Innes of Stowe, an eighteenth-century Scottish banker, was an obsessive bookkeeper. He kept multiple simultaneous account books, separating out his business interests from his estate, household, and personal expenditure. He even had small notebooks to record everyday purchases, including charity given to beggars on the street. Innes came from ... (Show more)
Gilbert Innes of Stowe, an eighteenth-century Scottish banker, was an obsessive bookkeeper. He kept multiple simultaneous account books, separating out his business interests from his estate, household, and personal expenditure. He even had small notebooks to record everyday purchases, including charity given to beggars on the street. Innes came from a family of account-keepers. The first record of his existence is a line recording the purchase of shoes for ‘Gibbie’ in his mother’s accounts. It was a family practice that he insisted his mistresses and illegitimate children (he had at least 30 and perhaps as many as 60) learned. Their anxiety over their expenditure and whether it was recorded accurately formed a significant theme in their correspondence. Accounting for this family became significant to their identity and relationship, a mechanism for producing family, controlling subordinates, and enabling certain forms of intimacies between its members. Accounting became a technology of self and emotional connection.
Since early work by Sabean and Medick, historians have been primed to the complex intersections between emotion and the economic. Recently new methodologies from the history of emotion have drawn attention to the ways that emotion, and not just economies, can act as social structures that shape behaviour and beliefs. Emotion is no longer a biological response to stimula but a material-discursive system that produces power relationships. This paper draws on this approach to reconsider how Gilbert Innes and his mistresses and children used accounting practices as a form of identity and relationship production, an accounting of self, family and emotion. In doing so, it reflects on the methodological practice of counting and accounting as an access point to emotion, and of emotion as a methodological lens for our engagement with economic systems. (Show less)

Henry French : Bringing the ‘Unspirited Dead and Useless Carcase’ to Life: Lineage, Emotions and Family Identity among the English Gentry, 1600-1800
Historians of the English gentry have tended to focus on formal genealogies as the primary means by which this group understood their past, and their status, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The later sixteenth century has been described as a time of 'genealogical mania', as new families tried to ... (Show more)
Historians of the English gentry have tended to focus on formal genealogies as the primary means by which this group understood their past, and their status, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The later sixteenth century has been described as a time of 'genealogical mania', as new families tried to bolster their status by acquiring family trees created by professional Heralds (genealogists) which extended back over many centuries, and linked up (often distantly) to illustrious historical figures.
However, families also wrote their own histories, and dwelt particularly on the 'remembered family', which was often confined to three or four preceding generations, rather than the extended historical lineage – in the words of Denzil Holles, invoking the lives of such examples reanimated the ‘unspirited dead and useless carcase’ of family genealogy. This was a much more intimate historical family, remembered as embodied individuals, and whose personal stories formed oral family narratives of moral lessons and warnings. The paper argues that the 'remembered family' did not supplant family pedigrees, but it seems to have been regarded as more reliable, and a more 'authentic' source of family-history knowledge than less personal, more formal genealogies. By recounting the lives of embodied ancestors, whose physical description and personality quirks were remembered, narrators sought to preserve an emotional identification across generations, and bind past and future members into an emotional ‘community’ within a shared familial identity. (Show less)

Sarah Goldsmith : Shame and Shaming: Delineating the Eighteenth-century Elite Male Body through Emotion
In 1733, Charles Lennox, the 2nd Duke of Richmond played an elaborate practical joke on Doctor William Sherwin, an unpopular canon of Chichester cathedral. Richmond dressed up as a highway man, held up Sherwin’s coach, and then disseminated a cant-laden ‘confession’ describing Sherwin’s reactions. Amongst the many ways in which ... (Show more)
In 1733, Charles Lennox, the 2nd Duke of Richmond played an elaborate practical joke on Doctor William Sherwin, an unpopular canon of Chichester cathedral. Richmond dressed up as a highway man, held up Sherwin’s coach, and then disseminated a cant-laden ‘confession’ describing Sherwin’s reactions. Amongst the many ways in which Richmond humiliated Sherwin, his ‘confession’ included a visceral description of how ‘I whypt my hand into his pocket, which I could hardly do for his paunch, butt at last I lugg’d out his net’. The contrast and interaction between the two men’s bodies - the Duke, known for his handsome figure and concealed as a rudely robust highway man, groping around the canon’s soft waistline – added an extra sting to Richmond and Sherwin’s differing response of glee and shame.
Building on the recently histories of mockery, laughter and disability, this paper explores how emotions were used to assess and police eighteenth-century men’s bodies. Alongside considering the complexities of what constituted an ‘elite’ body, it also shifts focus from examining extreme bodily states to the murky boundaries of acceptance/rejection that surrounded bodies that were ‘a little too’ tall, short, fat or thin. (Show less)

Ulla Ijäs : Souvenirs and Keepsakes in the Nineteenth-century Urban Elite Families in Northern Baltic
Senator Carl Emil Cedercreutz's family spent Christmas 1872 in Rome. His wife, Emilie, in her letter to her mother in Vyborg, wrote how the family had spent their Christmas time; she wrote what presents they got and what souvenirs they had bought.
In this paper, I will explore the emotions ... (Show more)
Senator Carl Emil Cedercreutz's family spent Christmas 1872 in Rome. His wife, Emilie, in her letter to her mother in Vyborg, wrote how the family had spent their Christmas time; she wrote what presents they got and what souvenirs they had bought.
In this paper, I will explore the emotions connected with souvenirs and keepsakes. I will ask, for example, what keepsakes 19th-century Finnish urban elite families had, from where these objects were purchased or received and what emotions these objects transmitted. The objects I am interested in include souvenirs and keepsakes that carry an idea that the receiving person would remember the person giving the object or the objects included other emotional messages.
My sources are mainly letters from the Hackman family archive, kept by Åbo Akademi library in Turku, Finland. By studying these letters, it is possible to study not only from where the emotional objects were received but also study gendered emotional expressions when men and women might have had different material expressions for their emotions. (Show less)

Mark Rothery : The Emotional Economies of the Landed Gentry in Eighteenth Century England
‘Emotional economy’ describes the way in which emotions ‘do work’ in the world (beyond shaping individual experiences), for instance by channelling power and authority between individuals and within groups. Whilst the concept is broadly accepted by historians it has rarely been applied and analysed consistently for a single social group ... (Show more)
‘Emotional economy’ describes the way in which emotions ‘do work’ in the world (beyond shaping individual experiences), for instance by channelling power and authority between individuals and within groups. Whilst the concept is broadly accepted by historians it has rarely been applied and analysed consistently for a single social group across a significant period of history.
This paper examines the emotional economies of four gentry families across several generations during the eighteenth century as a means of beginning this project. Familial correspondence reveals the way that emotions were exchanged and traded as a form of currency between family members, as a means of constructing, distributing and mediating power. Individuals could acquire or lose credit through expressions of emotion, depending on the nature of the emotion and the gender and status of the individual. Parents, guardians and siblings could perform the function of middle-men, distributing the emotions of others, changing meanings to suit their own purposes and empowering themselves as well as advocating for their clients. Affective language could effect change, form and damage relationships, build and reinforce (sometimes deplete) the power and status of gentry men and women. Emotions played a key role, therefore, in determining the nature and functioning of the gentry family but the correspondence illustrates that there were significant variations in the emotional economies and the systems of emotional management across this series of emotional sub-communities. (Show less)



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