Preliminary Programme

Wed 24 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 25 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 26 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 27 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 24 March 2021 16.30 - 18.30
O-4 ELI04 Elites, Emotions and Indentities
Lipsius, 147
Network: Elites and Forerunners Chair: Nina Koefoed
Organizer: Mark Rothery Discussant: Nina Koefoed
Katie Barclay : Emotional Economies, Illegitimate Intimacies and Gilbert Innes of Stowe
Gilbert Innes of Stowe, an eighteenth-century Scottish banker, was an obsessive bookkeeper. He kept multiple simultaneous account books, separating out his business interests from his estate, household, and personal expenditure. He even had small notebooks to record everyday purchases, including charity given to beggars on the street. Innes came from ... (Show more)
Gilbert Innes of Stowe, an eighteenth-century Scottish banker, was an obsessive bookkeeper. He kept multiple simultaneous account books, separating out his business interests from his estate, household, and personal expenditure. He even had small notebooks to record everyday purchases, including charity given to beggars on the street. Innes came from a family of account-keepers. The first record of his existence is a line recording the purchase of shoes for ‘Gibbie’ in his mother’s accounts. It was a family practice that he insisted his mistresses and illegitimate children (he had at least 30 and perhaps as many as 60) learned. Their anxiety over their expenditure and whether it was recorded accurately formed a significant theme in their correspondence. Accounting for this family became significant to their identity and relationship, a mechanism for producing family, controlling subordinates, and enabling certain forms of intimacies between its members. Accounting became a technology of self and emotional connection.
Since early work by Sabean and Medick, historians have been primed to the complex intersections between emotion and the economic. Recently new methodologies from the history of emotion have drawn attention to the ways that emotion, and not just economies, can act as social structures that shape behaviour and beliefs. Emotion is no longer a biological response to stimula but a material-discursive system that produces power relationships. This paper draws on this approach to reconsider how Gilbert Innes and his mistresses and children used accounting practices as a form of identity and relationship production, an accounting of self, family and emotion. In doing so, it reflects on the methodological practice of counting and accounting as an access point to emotion, and of emotion as a methodological lens for our engagement with economic systems. (Show less)

Kristine Dyrmann : “Ma chère Louise”: Emotions and Letter-writing in the Collection of Louise Stolberg (1746-1824)
In the 1820s, Louise Stolberg collected and edited a life-time’s letters received from her friends, family and correspondents, saving the letters in bundles and bound books in the attic of her brother’s country house. Louise Stolberg herself remains an evasive character, as her letters are missing in the collection, except ... (Show more)
In the 1820s, Louise Stolberg collected and edited a life-time’s letters received from her friends, family and correspondents, saving the letters in bundles and bound books in the attic of her brother’s country house. Louise Stolberg herself remains an evasive character, as her letters are missing in the collection, except for a series of annual New Year’s greetings.
Through a close reading of the letters in her collection, this paper seeks to uncover the editor from her collection. It does so by exploring the emotional bonds of family and friendship expressed in the letters, as well as the traces of early romantic literary influences, asking how emotions were expressed and practiced through letter-writing in a late eighteenth-century group of family, friends and political allies.
Among Louise Stolberg’s correspondents were Goethe, a former Danish foreign minister and a finance minister, and a former prime minister who also happened to be her brother. Together, the ministers formed a political fraction, which had taken power at the Danish court in a 1784 bloodless coup d’état. Louise Stolberg’s pocketbooks list her vast network of correspondents, stretching from Copenhagen to Jena. However, most of the letters were written by the women of the Bernstorff-Reventlow-Schimmelmann political party – the German poet Klopstock stating that “writing letters was like an illness” to the women of this circle.
The collection gives us an insight into the multiple meanings of the correspondence circulating within a group that was bound by both political, literary and familial interests. The paper thus explores how letters and expressions of emotional bonds were written, circulated and read, and the impact of age, literary influences and life situation on letter-writing styles, experiences and family identities.
(Show less)

Sarah Goldsmith : Shame and Shaming: Delineating the Eighteenth-century Elite Male Body through Emotion
In 1733, Charles Lennox, the 2nd Duke of Richmond played an elaborate practical joke on Doctor William Sherwin, an unpopular canon of Chichester cathedral. Richmond dressed up as a highway man, held up Sherwin’s coach, and then disseminated a cant-laden ‘confession’ describing Sherwin’s reactions. Amongst the many ways in which ... (Show more)
In 1733, Charles Lennox, the 2nd Duke of Richmond played an elaborate practical joke on Doctor William Sherwin, an unpopular canon of Chichester cathedral. Richmond dressed up as a highway man, held up Sherwin’s coach, and then disseminated a cant-laden ‘confession’ describing Sherwin’s reactions. Amongst the many ways in which Richmond humiliated Sherwin, his ‘confession’ included a visceral description of how ‘I whypt my hand into his pocket, which I could hardly do for his paunch, butt at last I lugg’d out his net’. The contrast and interaction between the two men’s bodies - the Duke, known for his handsome figure and concealed as a rudely robust highway man, groping around the canon’s soft waistline – added an extra sting to Richmond and Sherwin’s differing response of glee and shame.
Building on the recently histories of mockery, laughter and disability, this paper explores how emotions were used to assess and police eighteenth-century men’s bodies. Alongside considering the complexities of what constituted an ‘elite’ body, it also shifts focus from examining extreme bodily states to the murky boundaries of acceptance/rejection that surrounded bodies that were ‘a little too’ tall, short, fat or thin. (Show less)

Marja Vuorinen : Adapting to Modernity? 19th-century Finnish Noblemen (Re)defining their Status
Relates to land reforms: politics, personalities, contexts, causes, consequences



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