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Wed 24 March
    11.00 - 12.15
    12.30 - 13.45
    14.30 - 15.45
    16.00 - 17.15

Thu 25 March
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    12.30 - 13.45
    14.30 - 15.45
    16.00 - 17.15

Fri 26 March
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    12.30 - 13.45
    14.30 - 15.45
    16.00 - 17.15

Sat 27 March
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    12.30 - 13.45
    14.30 - 15.45
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 24 March 2021 16.00 - 17.15
T-4 REL06 Scandals, Corruption and Ecclesiastical Judges (16th -18th C.)
T
Network: Religion Chair: Anna Bellavitis
Organizers: - Discussant: Silvia Evangelisti
Moderators: -
Benedetta Borello : Feelings on Corruption within the Papal Court between the Notion of ‘Scandal’, 'Outrage’ and ‘Sloth’(17th – 18th C.)
This paper will focus on corruption cases of bishops, regulars and pontifical treasurers and on their behaviour, defined in the sources as «scandalous» or «outrageous». In the period 1668-1708 such abuses could engender legal action as much as tactful cover up, via complex strategies, involving both the defendants and the ... (Show more)
This paper will focus on corruption cases of bishops, regulars and pontifical treasurers and on their behaviour, defined in the sources as «scandalous» or «outrageous». In the period 1668-1708 such abuses could engender legal action as much as tactful cover up, via complex strategies, involving both the defendants and the judges. Cross-referencing the sources (the cardinals congregations of the Council, of Bishops and Regulars and the Criminal Court of the Treasurer) the notion of ‘scandal’, ‘outrage’ and ‘sloth’will be investigated for the period in-between the 17th and the 18th centuries. (Show less)

Juan Ibáñez Castro : The Prophetism in the Spanish Inquisition Courts in the Modern Age (16th-18th Centuries)
In the context of the Catholic Monarchy, which was governed by the Habsburgs who considered themselves the chosen one for leading Christianity, many people considered themselves the authentic messengers of God. The politics and culture of modern Spain gave rise to it. The result was a discourse that legitimized the ... (Show more)
In the context of the Catholic Monarchy, which was governed by the Habsburgs who considered themselves the chosen one for leading Christianity, many people considered themselves the authentic messengers of God. The politics and culture of modern Spain gave rise to it. The result was a discourse that legitimized the power of the Monarchy, but could also rebel against it if it evaded the control of the authorities.

The Catholic Church was the institution most vulnerable in this situation; the intimate spiritual trends threatened the basis of its existence: the control of divine knowledge. For this reason, the ecclesial efforts were led to establish a clear and defined orthodoxy. This line was supported by the civil authorities of the Monarchy. We should remember the Church was the essential base for the control and social discipline during the Old Regime in Spain. However, the formative and preventive measures were not always effective, forcing the Holy Inquisition to act against the prophets and visionaries.

Many men and women considered themselves, and were socially accepted, as prophets and messengers of God. Sometimes we think that all of them were mystics, people of a great inner religiosity, however, we must not forget that for each spiritual there were many others who had a much more popular profile. Being in a direct communication with the divinity, prophetism escaped from the ecclesiastical control while having a great prestige in a society that was as religious as superstitious. In a certain way, the prophets personify the desires and social needs, while the ecclesiastical action is a symptom of the fears and misgivings of authorities.

Most historians agree with these premises, within the complexity and variety of the field. We intend to deepen in it through diverse documentary sources and methodologies. In this line, one of the main questions is to know the real intervention of the Inquisition in the face of this reality, and especially, to discover the real practices of the court, the attitudes of its ministers as well as the situation, discourses and profiles of the accused prophets. Through the inquisitorial trials, we can know the circumstances that religion and power hide among its complexities. In this sense, we will be able to reveal the lives of those who using prophetism tried to develop alternative worlds, or perhaps simply survive, and those who used their authority to face them to maintain the established order. (Show less)

Francesca Medioli : Nuns, Monks, Judges and Courtesans: a Double Florentine Scandal (17th C.)
In 1620 and again in 1660, St. Verdiana nunnery was at the core of a double scandal. Not only the nuns, all from the same kinship, but also the outside men, involved in the scandals, had strong bonds, both familial and social, with courtesans and judges. Via cross-reference of specific ... (Show more)
In 1620 and again in 1660, St. Verdiana nunnery was at the core of a double scandal. Not only the nuns, all from the same kinship, but also the outside men, involved in the scandals, had strong bonds, both familial and social, with courtesans and judges. Via cross-reference of specific sources, in Florence and in Rome, this case study will show the amount of corruption displayed during the trials by the defendants and their families, together with the amount of skilful tactics both men and women performed against their judges, challenging the idea of victims versus punishers. (Show less)

Maurizio Sangalli : Disobedience and Misconduct in Regular and Secular Clergy in the Early Modern Period: some Case Studies
This paper will compare and contrast the various options opted bythe ecclesiastical upper spheres in dealingwith delicate ‘hot cases’ that involved priests, friars and monks. The sources comefrom the Rome central archives, bothfrom the cardinals’ congregations and the religious orders. This permits us to explore the relationship between lay and ... (Show more)
This paper will compare and contrast the various options opted bythe ecclesiastical upper spheres in dealingwith delicate ‘hot cases’ that involved priests, friars and monks. The sources comefrom the Rome central archives, bothfrom the cardinals’ congregations and the religious orders. This permits us to explore the relationship between lay and religious powers, the protection networks at the local level, and the procedures of compromise or delay that eventuallysolved the largest amount of cases, restricting ‘scandals’to the most explosive ones only. (Show less)



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