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Wed 18 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 19 March
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 20 March
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 21 March
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    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 18 March 2020 16.30 - 18.30
T-4 REL06 Scandals, Corruption and Ecclesiastical Judges (16th -18th C.)
Reuvensplaats 4, 101E
Network: Religion Chair: Anna Bellavitis
Organizer: Benedetta Borello Discussant: Silvia Evangelisti
Benedetta Borello : Feelings on Corruption within the Papal Court between the Notion of ‘Scandal’, 'Outrage’ and ‘Sloth’(17th – 18th C.)
This paper will focus on corruption cases of bishops, regulars and pontifical treasurers and on their behaviour, defined in the sources as «scandalous» or «outrageous». In the period 1668-1708 such abuses could engender legal action as much as tactful cover up, via complex strategies, involving both the defendants and the ... (Show more)
This paper will focus on corruption cases of bishops, regulars and pontifical treasurers and on their behaviour, defined in the sources as «scandalous» or «outrageous». In the period 1668-1708 such abuses could engender legal action as much as tactful cover up, via complex strategies, involving both the defendants and the judges. Cross-referencing the sources (the cardinals congregations of the Council, of Bishops and Regulars and the Criminal Court of the Treasurer) the notion of ‘scandal’, ‘outrage’ and ‘sloth’will be investigated for the period in-between the 17th and the 18th centuries. (Show less)

Simona Feci : Forms of Corruption and Jurisdictional Network: a Case Study in Baroque Rome
This paper will present a case study regarding the trial lodged by the Holy Office against a lay civil servant in Rome during the 1630s. The defendant, a former penal judge himself, was trailed for having falsified some documents of a bigamist's case, together with this secretary. Obviously, the case ... (Show more)
This paper will present a case study regarding the trial lodged by the Holy Office against a lay civil servant in Rome during the 1630s. The defendant, a former penal judge himself, was trailed for having falsified some documents of a bigamist's case, together with this secretary. Obviously, the case was the end of his career. Such case study allows us to examine the several intertwined jurisdictions and the possible attempts of corruption and malpracticeinvolving civil servants within the Papal State during the early modern period. (Show less)

Francesca Medioli : Nuns, Monks, Judges and Courtesans: a Double Florentine Scandal (17th C.)
In 1620 and again in 1660, St. Verdiana nunnery was at the core of a double scandal. Not only the nuns, all from the same kinship, but also the outside men, involved in the scandals, had strong bonds, both familial and social, with courtesans and judges. Via cross-reference of specific ... (Show more)
In 1620 and again in 1660, St. Verdiana nunnery was at the core of a double scandal. Not only the nuns, all from the same kinship, but also the outside men, involved in the scandals, had strong bonds, both familial and social, with courtesans and judges. Via cross-reference of specific sources, in Florence and in Rome, this case study will show the amount of corruption displayed during the trials by the defendants and their families, together with the amount of skilful tactics both men and women performed against their judges, challenging the idea of victims versus punishers. (Show less)

Maurizio Sangalli : Disobedience and Misconduct in Regular and Secular Clergy in the Early Modern Period: some Case Studies
This paper will compare and contrast the various options opted bythe ecclesiastical upper spheres in dealingwith delicate ‘hot cases’ that involved priests, friars and monks. The sources comefrom the Rome central archives, bothfrom the cardinals’ congregations and the religious orders. This permits us to explore the relationship between lay and ... (Show more)
This paper will compare and contrast the various options opted bythe ecclesiastical upper spheres in dealingwith delicate ‘hot cases’ that involved priests, friars and monks. The sources comefrom the Rome central archives, bothfrom the cardinals’ congregations and the religious orders. This permits us to explore the relationship between lay and religious powers, the protection networks at the local level, and the procedures of compromise or delay that eventuallysolved the largest amount of cases, restricting ‘scandals’to the most explosive ones only. (Show less)



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