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Wed 24 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 25 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 26 March
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 27 March
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 24 March 2021 16.30 - 18.30
W-4 SPA07b Spatial Analysis of Population Geography and Occupational Structure II: Occupational Geography and Spatial Economics
Matthias de Vrieshof 2, 004
Networks: Economic History , Spatial and Digital History Chair: Alexis Litvine
Organizers: - Discussant: Leigh Shaw-Taylor
Isabelle Devos, Anne Winter : Geographies of Population, Health and Wealth in Early Modern Flanders and Brabant. Results from the Stream Project
This paper examines the geography of demographic and socio-economic performance in early modern Brabant and Flanders in a comparative perspective. Drawing on a wide range of original and locally diversified demographic, social and economic data made available via the STREAM database together with a tailored historical Geographical Information System (based ... (Show more)
This paper examines the geography of demographic and socio-economic performance in early modern Brabant and Flanders in a comparative perspective. Drawing on a wide range of original and locally diversified demographic, social and economic data made available via the STREAM database together with a tailored historical Geographical Information System (based on the Map of Ferraris (1778)), we investigate spatial (in)equalities and evaluate the relative importance of local variation versus regional clustering. We examine spatial patterns in population and their interrelationship with socio-economic conditions such as occupational structure and poor relief. By delivering a panoramic vista of local and regional developments within early modern Brabant and Flanders, we are able to move beyond the well-known urban-rural dichotomies and identify possible forerunners in the road to demographic transition and economic modernization. As such, this paper links up with current international discussions on the origins of modern economic and population growth and with recent historiographical trends that strongly advocate a regional approach. (Show less)

Jacob Field, Leigh Shaw-Taylor : Creating a New Economic History of London: Occupational Change and Urban Growth, c. 1600-1900
From the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries London grew from a relatively small city on the periphery of the European economy to become one of the largest metropolises in the world, and a global trading hub. This paper uses occupational data (primarily for men, although the nature of women’s work will ... (Show more)
From the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries London grew from a relatively small city on the periphery of the European economy to become one of the largest metropolises in the world, and a global trading hub. This paper uses occupational data (primarily for men, although the nature of women’s work will be examined in detail for the period after 1851, when systematic data for them becomes available for the first time) to present an overview of how London’s workforce changed during this period. This will illustrate how London's economic function developed as Great Britain experienced the First Industrial Revolution. Understanding these trends requires a range of datasources, including legal records, baptismal and marriage registers, and the Census. These all have to be recalibrated and re-weighted to correct for their respective biases in order to gain a truly accurate picture of London's economic history.
Although early modern London’s economy has been much studied in the past, few historians have utilised datasets that accurately represent the entire metropolis, particularly for the period before the 1851 Census. This paper’s findings are based on a new analysis of sources that have previously not been systematically analysed. For the seventeenth century, this paper will use recognizances, which are legal records that recorded the occupations of the vast majority of men named in them; although there are skews in the data, they can be accounted for by re-weighting them using occupational data from baptismal registers, which are available for some parishes in London. The early eighteenth century data derives from the marriage registers of the Fleet Prison. In this period about half of all London marriages were celebrated in the jurisdiction of the Fleet. Likewise, a comparison with occupational data for parishes whose baptism registers records occupations with men marrying in the Fleet from the same parishes provides the basis for re-calibrating the Fleet data. The Fleet data are then compared with a complete sample of all of London’s baptism registers taken from 1813 to 1820, when every parish recorded the occupation of the father, and with the 1851, 1881, and 1911 censuses. The paper thus presents the first ever estimates of London’s occupational structure before the mid-mid-nineteenth century. This allows us to identify the range and scale of economic activities for the first time. London remained the largest manufacturing centre in Britain throughout, but the whole period was characterised by a very substantial relative shift away from manufacturing to the service sector. (Show less)

Robin Philips : Continuity or Change? The Spatial Evolution of Industry in the Netherlands and Belgium (1820 – 2010)
This paper presents evidence on the long-run trends in the location of industry in Belgium and the Netherlands, examining regional specialization and path dependence and their respective explanatory factors during the 1820s-2010s. Throughout this period, both countries faced structural changes in their industry mix and spatial distribution of economic activities. ... (Show more)
This paper presents evidence on the long-run trends in the location of industry in Belgium and the Netherlands, examining regional specialization and path dependence and their respective explanatory factors during the 1820s-2010s. Throughout this period, both countries faced structural changes in their industry mix and spatial distribution of economic activities. Regional specialization in industry is found to have increased in both countries during the 1820s-1930s, followed by a stabilization during the 1930s-1970s and subsequent decline in recent times. In contrast, the level of path dependence in industry declined throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Our evidence is consistent with economic theories based on positive feedback effects related to economies of scale and sunk cost effects related to hysteresis that prevents the relocation of industry. We find that the higher prevalence of capital-intensive industries in the Belgian industry mix resulted in a stronger sunk cost effect during the 1850s- 1970s, which helps to explain the relative higher relocation of industries in (the south of) Belgium from the 1960s onwards. (Show less)

Konrad Wnek, Lidia Zyblikiewicz : Spatial Analysis of the Occupational Structure of Galicia's Population in the Second Half of the 19th Century
The paper presents the results of research on the issue of the occupational structure of the population of Galicia (the country of the Habsburg monarchy) based on the published censuses from 1880-1900. The research so far focused exclusively on the occupational structure of the population of the entire province without ... (Show more)
The paper presents the results of research on the issue of the occupational structure of the population of Galicia (the country of the Habsburg monarchy) based on the published censuses from 1880-1900. The research so far focused exclusively on the occupational structure of the population of the entire province without considering its division into smaller administrative units. The available data made it possible to study the occupational structure by gender according to districts, the number of which ranged from 76 to 85. This made it possible to present the occupational structure according to different occupational groups, taking into account the influence of the natural environment on it. Changes in the occupational structure were observed both in space and time. These years were a period of intensive changes in both the population (demographic transformation, migration of the population from rural to urban areas) and the duration of modernization processes that led to the transition from the traditional modern society. These changes, however, were not rapid, but evolutionary, in particular as far as women's professional work is concerned. It was also possible to locate economically more developed areas, which were centres of industry (weaving industry, oil extraction and processing). (Show less)



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