Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

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Wednesday 12 April 2023 08.30 - 10.30
N-1 ETH19 Elites & Migration
C32
Network: Ethnicity and Migration Chair: Laura Katarina Ekholm
Organizers: - Discussants: -
Moderators: -
Christin Mays : Transatlantic Exchanges: Scholarships and Academic Mobility between Sweden and the United States, ca 1912–1989
Large-scale, organized, transatlantic academic mobility is a phenomenon which began in the early twentieth century. This mobility has often been understood in relation to the involvement of state and private actors over the twentieth century as well as in relation to the networks produced and the transfer of knowledge to ... (Show more)
Large-scale, organized, transatlantic academic mobility is a phenomenon which began in the early twentieth century. This mobility has often been understood in relation to the involvement of state and private actors over the twentieth century as well as in relation to the networks produced and the transfer of knowledge to and between different countries. In the case of Sweden and the United States, scholarships were important for facilitating a steady flow of students, teachers and researchers to universities and companies between the two countries. From the end of World War II, this mobility was increasingly defined by the flow of Swedes to the United States. This paper uses an institutional perspective to understand the different logics of three important scholarship programs in the Swedish-American context, reflecting on the role these programs played in structuring flows of knowledge between Sweden and the United States from the 1910s to the 1980s. (Show less)

Orly Meron : Banking, Migration and State-building: a Case Study from British Mandated Eretz Israel
The socio-economic integration of Jewish migrants in Israel, especially during the first two decades of the British Mandate pre-state period (1920s – 1930s) presents various case studies, which address financial issues through migrant owned banks. These migrant-owned banks, become private sectorial banks, contributed to the growth of the host country’s ... (Show more)
The socio-economic integration of Jewish migrants in Israel, especially during the first two decades of the British Mandate pre-state period (1920s – 1930s) presents various case studies, which address financial issues through migrant owned banks. These migrant-owned banks, become private sectorial banks, contributed to the growth of the host country’s economy.
The aim of the proposed paper is to present the historical case study of Discount Bank in Israel, established by the Sephardic migrants from Greece in 1936. Based on private archival documents the proposed paper will show how the bank’s migrant entrepreneurs facilitate the accessibility of formal credit sources essential for socio-economic integration of their co-ethnics, and consequently contributing to the host economy’s growth. Raising capital for the bank by issuing shares reveals the networks of the elites that supported the founding of the migrant sectorial bank.
While using qualitative and quantitative methods, this paper would be especially helpful to study the phenomena of banking by migrants, or for migrants, throughout state-building phase. (Show less)

Ramon Ramon-Muñoz : The Persistence of the Migration-trade Link: Southern-European Immigration and Olive Oil Imports in the Americas before the Great Depression
This paper examines the relationship between migration and trade. It analyses the potential pro-trade effect of Southern-European immigration on olive oil imports in the Americas over the period 1875-1930.
Olive oil was an essential good in the diet of the Mediterranean population, which consumed around 80 per cent of total ... (Show more)
This paper examines the relationship between migration and trade. It analyses the potential pro-trade effect of Southern-European immigration on olive oil imports in the Americas over the period 1875-1930.
Olive oil was an essential good in the diet of the Mediterranean population, which consumed around 80 per cent of total world olive oil consumption in the period 1924/1928. It was also a staple commodity in the export trade of many of the countries bordering on the Mediterranean basin, ranking third among Spanish exports and fourth among Greek ones in the late 1920s. Lastly, and very important, it was a product that in the Americas faced the concurrence of many substitute products, including butter, margarine, lard, and an extensive list of vegetable oils. Whether southern European immigrants transformed their consumption patterns over time, switching from olive oil to other oleaginous products, is one of the issues this case study explores. The other central issue of the paper is whether differences exist in the import-immigration nexus across immigrants' destination and origin countries. (Show less)

Mladen Zobec : Proletarian Entrepreneurs: Albanian Private Craftsmen in Socialist Slovenia
During Yugoslav socialism, Albanians were over-represented among the internal-migrant businesses and crafts. Occupational concentration in certain businesses caused Albanians to become synonymous with bakers, ice-cream sellers, and fruit and vegetable vendors. Despite ubiquity the peculiar experience of Albanian socialist privateers in Yugoslavia remains poorly understood in the literature. Relying on ... (Show more)
During Yugoslav socialism, Albanians were over-represented among the internal-migrant businesses and crafts. Occupational concentration in certain businesses caused Albanians to become synonymous with bakers, ice-cream sellers, and fruit and vegetable vendors. Despite ubiquity the peculiar experience of Albanian socialist privateers in Yugoslavia remains poorly understood in the literature. Relying on archival research and oral history this paper shows that Albanian migrants from Kosovo and Macedonia oftentimes opted for family businesses over social sector employment despite less favorable working conditions and poorer financial prospects.

In an attempt to overcome the reduction of the phenomenon to mere ‘tradition’, the paper explains how political and economic conditions in socialist Yugoslavia interacted with Albanian cultural legacies to enable the proliferation of Albanian ethnic and family businesses in Slovenia and elsewhere in Yugoslavia. In doing so, three interconnected factors are explored. Firstly, the Yugoslav socialist unemployment was experienced in Albanian populated areas in the Yugoslav southeast. Private businesses functioned as a remedy for severe unemployment. Secondly, the Othering and orientalising practices directed towards the Albanian population contributed to the distrust towards Yugoslav state institutions and the process of socialist modernisation. This distrust in turn made the private economic sphere more attractive than the state or social sector. Thirdly, the comparatively large Albanian extended families had better prospects to survive as a unit of reproduction if engaged in a family business compared to the atomised socialist workspace. (Show less)



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