Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

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Wednesday 12 April 2023 11.00 - 13.00
A-2 WOM02 Academic Citizenship, Persona and Gender – Exploring the Micropolitics of Inclusion and Exclusion in Science and Scholarship
Victoriagatan 13, A243
Network: Women and Gender Chairs: -
Organizers: Dunja Blazevic, Kirsti Niskanen Discussants: -
Moderators: -
Dunja Blazevic : The Ideal Philologist and Historian, seen through the Eyes of a Hiring Committee
Inspired by Lorraine Daston and Otto Sibum’s term scholarly persona, this paper asks what constituted an ideal philologist and an ideal historian in hiring committee reports at the newly founded University of Bergen in these two areas in the 1950s and 1960s. Although there had been philological and historical research ... (Show more)
Inspired by Lorraine Daston and Otto Sibum’s term scholarly persona, this paper asks what constituted an ideal philologist and an ideal historian in hiring committee reports at the newly founded University of Bergen in these two areas in the 1950s and 1960s. Although there had been philological and historical research done at Bergen Museum prior to the opening of the university, the great expansion in historical and philological research and teaching came after the university was founded through a series of appointments of professors tasked with creating a new academic institution. In the paper, I show how the hiring committees judged the applicants’ personal and professional traits, how the judgements were shaped by existing scholarly standards for philological and historical work in Norway and by the needs of the new institution for professors who could both teach and do research. In a time where men still dominated both as students and as academics, I also show how the hiring practices created an almost exclusively male homosocial world for the first two decades after World War II. (Show less)

Heini Hakosalo : What’s in a Space? The Dissection Room and the Clinic as Normative and Formative Spaces in Fin-de-siècle Medical Training
The paper explores gendered academic citizenship in late nineteenth- and early twentieth century medical teaching (circa 1880-1920), primarily in Finland. The four loci of medical training were the lecture hall, dissection room, clinic, and laboratory. The dissection room and the clinic were the most important experientially and from the point ... (Show more)
The paper explores gendered academic citizenship in late nineteenth- and early twentieth century medical teaching (circa 1880-1920), primarily in Finland. The four loci of medical training were the lecture hall, dissection room, clinic, and laboratory. The dissection room and the clinic were the most important experientially and from the point of view of full academic and / or professional citizenship. They emerge as idiosyncratic, transformative and emotionally loaded both in contemporary sources – letters and diaries – and in retrospective autobiographical accounts. I will use both kinds of sources, complemented with snapshot photographs, to discuss the nature of these spaces, the specific forms of social interaction and professional skills that they fostered, and their significance for academic citizenship and professional identity. In Finland, men and women accessed them on the same formal conditions. However, there were tacit gendered differences in how men and women were expected to conduct themselves and relate to each other in them, and in the intangible goods that they were able to take on to their professional lives. More generally, the paper argues for the crucial importance that physically sharing spaces has for gaining full academic / professional membership, a point that Covid-19 has again made non-trivial. (Show less)

Kirsti Niskanen : Research Economy and Gendered Academic Citizenship in Sweden, 1920s -1950s
The institutionalization of scientific funding profoundly marked the academic landscapes of the twentieth century. Many of the funding agencies that exist today, transnational and national, private and public, were founded in the interwar years. They created new economic structures in higher education and research, and they acted as gatekeepers who, ... (Show more)
The institutionalization of scientific funding profoundly marked the academic landscapes of the twentieth century. Many of the funding agencies that exist today, transnational and national, private and public, were founded in the interwar years. They created new economic structures in higher education and research, and they acted as gatekeepers who, through selection and evaluation procedures, influenced what was perceived as topical research and who were perceived as good, “real” researchers.
In Sweden, the state research councils were founded only in the 1940s. Extra-academic scientific funding therefore played an important role when new disciplines and research areas were created between the 1920s and 1950s. These were also the decades when women slowly entered the academic labor market as researchers and academic teachers. This paper compares the funding and evaluation policy and practices of the two largest research funders in interwar Sweden, the Swedish Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (founded in 1917/1918) and the American Rockefeller Foundation (that started funding research in Europe after the First World War). I show how the research economy and the allocation of grants created opportunity structures and paths to academic citizenship (permanent positions, recognition, belonging) and promoted the creation of academic identities (scientific/scholarly personae) that only a few women had the opportunity to live up to. (Show less)



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