Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

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Wednesday 12 April 2023 11.00 - 13.00
Q-2 TEC02 Computers, Information, and Data
E44
Network: Science & Technology Chairs: -
Organizers: - Discussants: -
Moderators: -
Eero Hyvonen : PaliamentSampo - Parliament of Finland on the Semantic Web 1907-2022
The paper presents ParliamentSampo, a Linked Open Data Service and semantic portal for studying political culture and language in Finland since 1907. The data includes about one million parliamentary speeches in RDF and Parla-Clarin format intergratied with a proposographical knowledge graph of the Members of the Parliamen, organizartons, and ... (Show more)
The paper presents ParliamentSampo, a Linked Open Data Service and semantic portal for studying political culture and language in Finland since 1907. The data includes about one million parliamentary speeches in RDF and Parla-Clarin format intergratied with a proposographical knowledge graph of the Members of the Parliamen, organizartons, and related concepts. Result in using the system for linguistic analyses of debates well as for network analyses of politicians are reported. (Show less)

Julia Ravanis : From Calculation Girls to System Developers: Practices and Professions in the Postwar Data Processing Centers in Sweden
Programming is today a profession dominated to men, and the programming identity is defined by masculine characteristics such as lone ingenuity and social awkwardness. And yet, computing history has recently revealed a not too distant past when programming was an activity predominantly performed by women. These often started out as ... (Show more)
Programming is today a profession dominated to men, and the programming identity is defined by masculine characteristics such as lone ingenuity and social awkwardness. And yet, computing history has recently revealed a not too distant past when programming was an activity predominantly performed by women. These often started out as manual computers, moved over to operate the electronic computers of the 1950s, and were then successively replaced by career-interested male programmers when computing spread and the programming profession gained status in the 1960s. The female programming geniuses of the past have had to wait for contemporary computing historians’ attention to receive their rightful praise.

In this paper, I argue that Swedish female programmers of the mid-20th century constitute an exception from this historical narrative. I map the group of people responsible for the numerical treatment and coding at the Swedish Defense Research Institute in Stockholm, where the most advanced data processing centres in Sweden were placed throughout the 1960s and 1970s. This group mainly consisted of women who had been human computers – somewhat derogatory called “calculation girls” at the institute – and who became responsible for programming when the institute purchased their first digital computer in 1959. But unlike their colleagues in for example US and Great Britain, these women managed to raise their professional status and eventually became both acclaimed and influential in the Swedish computing society. It was not until well after the 1960s, with its famous invention of the masculine “software engineer”, that the Swedish programming identity turned from feminine to masculine.

Through analysing the establishment of new professional identities at the data processing centres for defence research in Sweden, I will present an empirical case which highlights the historical coincidences that make a profession gendered in a certain way, and nuances the international history of computing and gender. (Show less)

Viktoriya Vinik : The Digital Palestinian Pound, E-Shekel, and the Three Print Currencies: Palestine’s Search for a National Currency in Cryptocurrencies
Palestine has not had a national currency since 1951. Since the 1993 Oslo Accord, the Occupied Palestinian Territories have been predominantly using the New Israeli Shekel (NIS) and all transactions with Israeli firms had to be settled with correspondent banking. In 2016, however, Israeli banks severed correspondent ties with Palestine ... (Show more)
Palestine has not had a national currency since 1951. Since the 1993 Oslo Accord, the Occupied Palestinian Territories have been predominantly using the New Israeli Shekel (NIS) and all transactions with Israeli firms had to be settled with correspondent banking. In 2016, however, Israeli banks severed correspondent ties with Palestine due to allegations of money laundering and terror financing. The termination of these correspondent banking services has had significant economic and security consequences. Palestinian and Israeli authorities are yet to find a long-term solution. With the growing popularity of cryptocurrency in the region, the Palestinian Monetary Authority (PMA) has recently proposed adopting a cryptocurrency as their national currency. This currency reform could provide fiscal autonomy, a stable means of payment from Israeli firms, and the space for economic growth for the occupied nation. Using existing national cryptocurrencies as case studies, this paper outlines the three ways in which the PMA can approach it and the ways in which this would impact the Palestinian job market. (Show less)



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