Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

All days
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Wednesday 12 April 2023 14.00 - 16.00
W-3 SPA01 Archives
Västra Hamngatan 25 AK2 135
Network: Spatial and Digital History Chairs: -
Organizers: - Discussants: -
Moderators: -
Milan Balaban, Jan Herman : Digital Archive of the Bata Company
The Bata Company, which evolved from a small workshop in Zlin in Moravia, today the Czech Republic, at the end of the 19th century, became one of the largest shoe producers in the entire world in the second half of the last century. This company became one of few Central ... (Show more)
The Bata Company, which evolved from a small workshop in Zlin in Moravia, today the Czech Republic, at the end of the 19th century, became one of the largest shoe producers in the entire world in the second half of the last century. This company became one of few Central European companies and the only one from the Czech lands to achieve the global status of a world-renowned firm in the period before the Second World War. The company was not just characterized by the unique organizational structure, technological innovations, but also with significant investments into the social life of its employees, for whom were built factory towns, schools, sports, and social facilities. After the Second World War, assets of the Bata Company were nationalized in newly communist countries of Eastern Europe. Still, the remaining factories and retail networks became the core of the new global shoemaking empire, which spread to more than 110 states on all inhabited continents. Effects of globalization and unsuccessful adaptation to the new circumstances in the world after the 1990s forced the company to close almost all of its factories and stores in Western Europe and North America and focus on emerging countries of Africa and Asia. During this process, while factories were closing in the US, Canada, Great Britain, France, Switzerland, and other countries, extensive company archives, which were holding documents from the earliest beginnings of the Bata enterprises in those countries, were also closed. Part of those documents was transferred to public archives, the private individuals saved part, but a significant part of them was lost during the process of closing the factories. In other countries, like India, Kenya, and elsewhere, where the factories are still in function, archival documents were not held in ideal terms, which led to losing many relevant data because the documents did not bear well humidity and tropical conditions. To save as much as possible of archival documents, company newsletters, photos, and other significant data, for future researchers, Tomas Bata University, which is the youngest Czech public university, named on the founder of the Company, Tomas Bata, in cooperation with Bata Company initiated the creation of the Digital Archive. During the last three years, historians from the Tomas Bata University researched in dozen former Bata factory towns in North America, Europe, and Asia and digitalized tens of thousands of documents. During the same time, developed was a program, which will make digitalized documents accessible to researchers (https://bataheritage.k.utb.cz/index.html ). In our paper, we want to present the process of creating the digital archive, research in archives in different continents, and problems that we encountered. We also want to discuss the positive and negative sides of cooperation with a private company during research and the creation of the archive. (Show less)

Katerina Capková : Romani Voices in Research of the Genocide of Sinti and Roma
Vast majority of research on the genocide of Roma and Sinti during the Second World War is based on documents of the state administration and it often reproduces the prejudiced view of Roma. In order to enable researchers, teachers, as well as members of Roma and Sinti community to access ... (Show more)
Vast majority of research on the genocide of Roma and Sinti during the Second World War is based on documents of the state administration and it often reproduces the prejudiced view of Roma. In order to enable researchers, teachers, as well as members of Roma and Sinti community to access the Romani testimonies, our team is creating a database of published Romani testimonies related - in the first phase - to the Bohemian Lands and to Slovakia. In my paper I would like to present the first results of this project that not only offers a more nuanced and complex view on Romani and Sinti experience of war and genocide. Thanks to a detailed analysis of the geographical data in the testimonies, the projects offers important data about the forced migration, special segregation and regional specifics of the genocide. (Show less)

Gerben Zaagsma : Uncovering the Forgotten Roots of Digital History: the Association for History and Computing
In recent years, scholars have started to investigate the diverse genealogies of the digital humanities, as part of efforts to consolidate the field by excavating its historical and intellectual underpinnings. This paper discusses the history of what we now call digital history, by focusing on its direct predecessor: the history ... (Show more)
In recent years, scholars have started to investigate the diverse genealogies of the digital humanities, as part of efforts to consolidate the field by excavating its historical and intellectual underpinnings. This paper discusses the history of what we now call digital history, by focusing on its direct predecessor: the history and computing movement. It argues that understanding the current era of digital history is impossible without knowledge of the transnational history & computing movement out of which it emerged.

The paper will first offer a conceptual framework for the nexus between technology and historical research practices and provide a brief outline of the uptake of computing in historical research in the post-WWII period, which was rooted in a broader context of engagement with reproduction and data processing technology that began in the late 19th century. From the 1940s onwards, historians begin to use analog and later digital computing, efforts that truly gained momentum from the early 1960s onwards in the United States, Western Europe and the Eastern bloc led by the Soviet Union, against the backdrop of the Cold War and a general surge in the use of computing in various humanities disciplines. By the late 1960s we begin to see the establishment of networks and structures to support what could be called an emerging transnational field of computing historians. A transition to a new phase began when first micro- and then personal computing were introduced at universities in the early 1980s and a new user generation of computing historians emerged.

As had happened almost two decades earlier, a transnational network would develop, but this time formalised in the Association for History and Computing (AHC) which existed until the early 2000s. The AHC’s history, activities, and many publications highlight the transnational outlook and intellectual breadth of the history and computing period and can served to probe the transition to and (dis)continuities with our current era of digital history. As I will argue, the history and computing movement did not simply give rise to digital history around the turn of the millennium. Despite the continued involvement of some older practitioners, many of the new digital historians were, as before, of a different user generation and the transition to digital history was thus much more than discursive. (Show less)

Douwe Zeldenrust : Managing Humanities Research Data and Collections, the Records Continuum Model and the Collections of the Meertens Institute
Access to data and collections is one of the most fundamental starting points for every humanities researcher. Increasingly, historians and social scientists use digital and digital-born information. Traditionally, these resources are managed by archivists using the ‘Life Cycle Model’ (LCM). This model was viewed as fundamental to archival ideas and ... (Show more)
Access to data and collections is one of the most fundamental starting points for every humanities researcher. Increasingly, historians and social scientists use digital and digital-born information. Traditionally, these resources are managed by archivists using the ‘Life Cycle Model’ (LCM). This model was viewed as fundamental to archival ideas and programs. But the need to work with digital records began to highlight key conceptual deficiencies in this paper-orientated model (Gilliland, 2017). This influenced the development of the ‘Records Continuum Model’ (RCM). This alternative model is more flexible and provides insight into the complex contexts in which (digital) documents are created and managed (McKemmish, 2017). It is progressively more adopted by governments e.g. and potentially provides a framework for managing resources of humanities institutions as well. But within that domain the LCM is still dominant. This paper will reflect on the potential and the issues of using the RCM as a concept for managing research data and collections of institutions within the humanities.

In order to make the first steps in introducing the RCM within this domain, two collections of the Meertens Institute (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences) will be taken as a use case. The Meertens Institute has a rich tradition in studying language and culture in the Netherlands. Its vast collections have been gathered in a period of over 90 years (Zeldenrust, 2020). The use cases have been selected on the bases of two criteria. First, the collections need to have been brought together over a longer period of time in order to make the collection management policies and possible changes visible. Second, they need to contain both analog and digital items in order to explore the suitability of the RCM for the diverse characteristics of humanities collections. The first use case is the audio collection 'Dutch in the U.S.A.' accumulated by Jo Daan (Collection 2001). The second one is the toponymy collection accumulated by Rob Rentenaar (Collection 191). Lastly, the use of the RCM as a concept for managing research data and collection of institutions within the humanities is part of my PhD research. As this research is ongoing, this paper will show work in progress.

Resources:
Gilliland, Anne J. (2017). ‘Archival and Recordkeeping Traditions in the Multiverse and Their Importance for Researching’. In Anne J. Gilliland, Sue McKemmish and Andrew J. Lau (eds.), Research in the Archival Multiverse. Monash University Publishing, pp 31-73.

McKemmish, Sue (2017). ‘Recordkeeping in the Continuum’. In: Anne J Gilliland, Sue McKemmish and Andrew J Lau (eds.), Research in the Archival Multiverse. Monash University Publishing, pp 122-160.

Zeldenrust, Douwe A. (2020). Verzamelen verandert, Collectiemanagement Plan Meertens Instituut 2020 - 2023. Amsterdam: Meertens Instituut.

Archives:
Meertens Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Collection ‘Jo Daan in Amerika’, 1966, Collection 2001.

Meertens Institute, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Collection ‘vernoemingsnamen’, 1960 - 2000, Collection 191. (Show less)



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