Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

All days
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Wednesday 12 April 2023 14.00 - 16.00
Y-3 ORA02 Oral History and Public History
Västra Hamngatan 25 AK2 138
Network: Oral History Chairs: -
Organizers: - Discussants: -
Moderators: -
Elmar Gams : Kogu Me Lugu - a Collection of Personal Stories of Estonia from the 20th Century
The oral history portal Kogu Me Lugu ('All Our Story', kogumelugu.ee) is an online platform of the Estonian Institute of Historical Memory where one can find interviews on various topics about the history of Estonia in the 20th century. Since 2013 we have been conducting interviews with people in Estonia ... (Show more)
The oral history portal Kogu Me Lugu ('All Our Story', kogumelugu.ee) is an online platform of the Estonian Institute of Historical Memory where one can find interviews on various topics about the history of Estonia in the 20th century. Since 2013 we have been conducting interviews with people in Estonia and abroad using three languages (Estonian, English, Russian). The aim is to give a universally accessible overview of the events in Estonia in the previous century both locally and globally.
As the manager of the Kogu Me Lugu activities since 2019, I would love to give an overview of what and how has been done so far, and what kind of opportunities could be there for researchers if they intended to use our platform and our stories. (Show less)

Leslie McCartney : Preserving the Unangax? (Alaska Aleut) Cuttlefish Project Recordings
How many culturally treasured recordings remain on shelves in oral history archives, inaccessible to the communities who made them? How can we, as curators of oral history collections, ensure that they see the light of day, preserve them and make them accessible to assist communities in their efforts of cultural ... (Show more)
How many culturally treasured recordings remain on shelves in oral history archives, inaccessible to the communities who made them? How can we, as curators of oral history collections, ensure that they see the light of day, preserve them and make them accessible to assist communities in their efforts of cultural and language revitalization projects?

With a grant from the National Recording Preservation Foundation, the Oral History Program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks will be able to professionally digitize, preserve and make accessible 59 ‘Cuttlefish Project’ magnetic audio reels. From the early 1970s to 1982, Ray Hudson supervised groups of Unalaska high school students in his Cuttlefish class. Community Elders were asked to come to the class and share with students in their Unangam Tunuu language, sometimes through the use of a translator, and sometimes in English, stories about themselves and other cultural and historical details. Ray recorded many of these sessions and they are the only recordings of their kind that exist from the Cuttlefish classes. Although the students produced 6 books in the Cuttlefish series, much of the information contained in the recordings was not used.

These recordings are very important culturally, historically and linguistically. Today all three remaining dialects of Unangam Tunuu are critically endangered. Many of the Elders featured were the last generation whose mother tongue was Unangam Tunuu. There is almost no documentation of interactions between Elders and children which is exactly what these recordings are. These recordings help contribute a voice to the diversity of Indigenous languages and cultures found not only in Alaska but in the entire United States. They are of the utmost importance to the Unangax? people themselves, for educators around the world who study the diversity of Indigenous people in the United States, and for worldwide linguists and historians. (Show less)

Santiago Ponsoda-López de Atalaya, Rubén Blanes-Mora : Teaching History through Oral History: an Educational Experience in the Training of History Teachers
This communication focuses on the teaching of history from oral sources and the benefits and drawbacks when incorporating this methodology in education. In this sense, the use of oral history allows students a greater approximation to the situation of groups and individuals far from the spheres of power and allows ... (Show more)
This communication focuses on the teaching of history from oral sources and the benefits and drawbacks when incorporating this methodology in education. In this sense, the use of oral history allows students a greater approximation to the situation of groups and individuals far from the spheres of power and allows reconstructing the past by interrelating it with the present. In this way, students discover a new way of actively approaching history and become generators of knowledge, while at the same time identifying with the past through their relationships with the people interviewed, which contributes to generating a significant learning, to establish social bonds and work on values and emotions
Thus, an investigation is presented focused on a didactic action aimed at teachers in training of Primary Education to teach history and at the same time deal with unfeasible topics, through oral sources, as is the case of the history of women in the second half of the 20th century in Spain.
The results obtained were positive, since they allowed the students to learn about an invisible history through an active and motivating methodology, while they learned about the didactic virtues of working with oral history in the classroom. (Show less)

Iben Vyff : “It hurts like hell, I tell you” – Oral History and Memories at Museums
” I was here when it was Elsinore Shipyard (…) And now, standing here, looking at how empty it is. It hurts like hell, I tell you.”

The man is strongly affected by the situation. He is being interviewed at his former workplace and stands in one of the abandoned ... (Show more)
” I was here when it was Elsinore Shipyard (…) And now, standing here, looking at how empty it is. It hurts like hell, I tell you.”

The man is strongly affected by the situation. He is being interviewed at his former workplace and stands in one of the abandoned halls of the former shipyard in Elsinore, closed 40 years earlier. The interview started at the local museum, but by now the location has shifted to the empty shipyard halls, and something changes with the man and his narrative. The hall, and the traces left behind from a bygone era, affect him. His memory work takes a different form and suddenly becomes more sensuous and bodily expressive.
The man is one of many former shipyard employees in Danish shipyards who have been interviewed in recent years. The interviews have taken place as a part of the research and dissemination project Voices from the shipyard, a collaborative project by the Museum of Elsinore and Roskilde University. As a part of this project, we are preoccupied with how memories are affected by different contexts and triggers, of which the man formerly mentioned is a good example. However, we are also concerned with the issue of how these memories can be communicated in a way that is perceived as present and relevant to the museum's visitors.
Informed by Oral History, Memory Studies and Museum Studies, this paper investigates how interviews with former shipyard employees can be collected and especially how they can be disseminated in the context of a museum based on the following considerations: How can it be made visible that memory work is a subjective, active and contemporary process? Based on a belief that a shared authority is the point of departure (Frisch 1990, 2011) how can we support the authority of the interviewees and ensures the authenticity around them and still balance the museum's role as a cultural authority? (Day 2009; Lowry & Duke 2012; de Jong 2018; Witcomb 2019 Brædder & Vyff 2021; Witcomb 2019). In addition to discussing what may appear to be an inherent ambivalence between the museum's consideration in communications and the authenticity of the interviewees, the audience's reactions to the dissemination will also be included. (Show less)



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