Preliminary Programme

Wed 12 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 13 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 14 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 15 April
    08.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00

All days
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Wednesday 12 April 2023 16.30 - 18.30
C-4 CUL04 Changing Historical Culture: Narrating a Nation in a State of Flux
Victoriagatan 13, Victoriasalen
Network: Culture Chair: Jukka Kortti
Organizer: Jukka Kortti Discussant: Stefan Berger
Moderators: -
Rami Mähkä : Ice Hockey as Finnish Cultural History’
Finland’s 1995 World Championship in ice hockey has been seen as a key moment in the country’s history of the last decades. Not only was it the first ever for Finland, but it happened as the country had hit economic depression of devastating economic and social consequences a few years ... (Show more)
Finland’s 1995 World Championship in ice hockey has been seen as a key moment in the country’s history of the last decades. Not only was it the first ever for Finland, but it happened as the country had hit economic depression of devastating economic and social consequences a few years earlier. The championship led ice hockey, already a very popular sport in the country, to become a reference point for a great variety of national, international, social and cultural topics. It was clear that ice hockey had entered Finnish cultural history at a very notable scale.
Drawing on a variety of media sources, my paper discusses discourses of ice hockey’s reflection of Finnish national history and culture. My examples highlight the variety of meanings given to ice hockey and the nation seemingly in love with it, from hyperbolic comparisons to Finland’s war effort in World War Two to more level-headed appraisals, carnivalistic public events to subversive and even downright hostile rhetoric. All these stances and ideas together highlight ice hockey’s relevance for understanding Finnish cultural history since the 1990s. (Show less)

Aleksi Marti : A Defence Victory or a Broken Mirror? Upper Secondary School Students´Narratives on Finland and the Role of Finns in the Second World War
In this paper I present a study that explored Finnish upper secondary school students´ narratives on Finland and the role of Finnish people in the World War two. The empirical body of the research consisted of essay narratives written by the upper secondary school students. As an analytical framework, James ... (Show more)
In this paper I present a study that explored Finnish upper secondary school students´ narratives on Finland and the role of Finnish people in the World War two. The empirical body of the research consisted of essay narratives written by the upper secondary school students. As an analytical framework, James Wertsch´s theory on “schematic narrative templates” was applied. The main findings suggest that many students relied on a schematic narrative template of “defence victory” as they constructed their narratives on the second world war. However, it must be noted that this was not the case in all the student´s narratives. Also, critical narratives appeared in which the schematic narrative template of “defence victory” was openly criticized and questioned. To conclude, the dispersion of the narratives and the varying degree of significance the students posed on them, supports an idea of describing the students´ historical consciousness as a “broken mirror”—a metaphor that was originally used to describe Germany`s diverse and contradictory historical culture. (Show less)

Mari Viita-aho : The Finnish National Museum Redefining its Practices in ‘The Story of Finland’-exhibition
In this presentation, I explore the permanent display in the Finnish National Museum (FNM) from the perspective of critical heritage studies, focusing on the production's outcomes and purposes. Presently, museums worldwide locate in a challenging position. Nationally, they must reply to the increasing expectations from policies and funding agencies. On ... (Show more)
In this presentation, I explore the permanent display in the Finnish National Museum (FNM) from the perspective of critical heritage studies, focusing on the production's outcomes and purposes. Presently, museums worldwide locate in a challenging position. Nationally, they must reply to the increasing expectations from policies and funding agencies. On a larger scale, they are a part of the international museum field, which is currently under existential negotiations about the definition and purpose of the museum. Additionally, Europe faces severe difficulties with exclusive and even radical nationalistic movements. National museums have had an essential role in producing the national identity, but these overlapping expectations highlight the urgent need of redefining their practices. These tensions are visible in the FNM's recent update on its permanent display. This presentation focuses on one part of the display, 'The Story of Finland' (2017), which creates a compelling narrative of the 100 years old independent Finland. 'The Story of Finland' was developed collaboratively with history researchers, visual professionals, and the FNM. The museum also appointed a film director to create the storyline. Essential questions are, how did the FNM use the exhibition, with what purposes, and what got excluded from it. The display locates at a rupture point for the FNM's exhibition practices and its broader role as a public institution. The presentation introduces the project and provides some answers to these critical questions. (Show less)



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