To bring together scholars who explain historical phenomena using the methods of the social sciences

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Wed 4 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 5 April
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    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30
    19.00 - 20.15
    20.30 - 22.00

Fri 6 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 7 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Saturday 7 April 2018 8.30 - 10.30
K-13 - ECO13a : Towards an Integrated Quantitative Account of European Economic Development at the Regional Level 1500-1914: the Promise of Occupational Structure. I
PFC/02/011 Sir Peter Froggatt Centre
Network: Economic History Chair: Erik Buyst
Organizers: Sebastian Keibek, Leigh Shaw-TaylorDiscussant: Guido Alfani
Maciej Bukowski , Piotr Korys, Maciej Tyminski : Late Feudalism or Start to Development? Evolution of Regional Occupational Structure of Polish Lands during Partitions (1750-1810)
Historical occupational structures of Poland are poorly documented. The aim of the paper is both, to present early reconstructions of the occupational structure of Poland in the second half of the eighteenth century on a regional level and to discuss methodological problems related to the use of historical censuses and ... (Show more)
Historical occupational structures of Poland are poorly documented. The aim of the paper is both, to present early reconstructions of the occupational structure of Poland in the second half of the eighteenth century on a regional level and to discuss methodological problems related to the use of historical censuses and other statistical sources for reconstructing Polish historical (pre-partition) occupational structure.
After a period of wars and internal conflicts as well as economic crises Poland in the last decades of existence (1750-1795) experienced a period of rapid economic recovery. Urban population grew, as well as the share of the modern sector in the economy. While statistical data from that period are scarce, using micro-level data, censuses made by Prussia for parts of the former Polish territory in late 1790s, censuses made by the administration of the Duchy of Warsaw (1808/1810) and some micro-level data we will try to reconstruct the occupational structure of Poland on both national and regional levels and its evolution. The results will be presented at aggregate PSTI level, as well as in more disaggregated form. We will discuss the evolution of occupational structure and compare it with occupational structures of other European peripheries in the context of the question: was the Polish economy still backward and feudal or was it already on the onset of modern development. (Show less)

Sebastian Keibek , Leigh Shaw-Taylor : The Occupational Structure in England and Wales 1580-1911: an Integrated Quantitative Account of Economic Development at National, Regional and Local Levels
ver the past fourteen years, researchers at the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure have collected detailed geographical and occupational data from parish registers, testamentary documents, and other sources, for over five million individuals living in England and Wales between 1580 and 1850. These data ... (Show more)
ver the past fourteen years, researchers at the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure have collected detailed geographical and occupational data from parish registers, testamentary documents, and other sources, for over five million individuals living in England and Wales between 1580 and 1850. These data have been combined with similar information for seventy-five million individuals recorded in the national censuses for 1851, 1881, and 1911. The datasets assembled allow us to fill fundamental gaps in our understanding of the process of industrialisation, catch-up development and the world’s first transition to modern economic growth over the whole 1580 to 1911 time period. They enable us to quantify developments at the local, regional and national level using a common metric.
This paper will present the results at a variety of spatial scales. At the national level, the key growth in the secondary sector’s share of the labour force took place, not in the century 1750-1850, but between 1550 and the early eighteenth century. Between 1750 and 1850 labour inputs in the secondary sector grew much more slowly than the national accounts literature (either Crafts/Harley or Broadberry et al) currently suggests, while labour productivity grew much more rapidly, suggesting much more pervasive technological change during the classic Industrial Revolution period. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the structural shift in employment was from agriculture to services, not from agriculture to industry.
Between 1550 and 1700 industrialisation was a feature of almost all regions of England and Wales. But during the eighteenth century different regions followed very divergent paths. A few regions continued to industrialise, but a much larger number de-industrialised as their proto-industries failed. In the nineteenth century, tertiary sector employment grew everywhere, largely because the ever-increasing output of the primary and secondary sectors came to be moved over ever larger distances, requiring vast numbers of workers in transport and distribution. The industrial regions shifted their employment structures away from industry somewhat, while the more agricultural parts of the country partially re-industrialised as the railways, for the first time, brought cheap coal and affordable steam-power to inland areas away from the coal-fields. (Show less)

Piotr Korys , Maciej Bukowski & Maciej Tyminski : The Road from Serfdom. Regional Occupational Structure of Polish Lands in the Nineteenth Century (1810-1921)
In year 1795 Poland ceased to exist. It was partitioned into three parts: Prussian, Russian and Austrian. One of the last “late-feudal” European states disappeared. The foundation of economy of Poland was the agricultural sector, and rural, peasant labour force consisted mostly of serfs. We will discuss the methodological ... (Show more)
In year 1795 Poland ceased to exist. It was partitioned into three parts: Prussian, Russian and Austrian. One of the last “late-feudal” European states disappeared. The foundation of economy of Poland was the agricultural sector, and rural, peasant labour force consisted mostly of serfs. We will discuss the methodological problems related to coherent reconstructions of occupational structures of the Polish lands in the nineteenth century (territory divided between three countries with different statistical regimes, different dynamics of development, limited number of other sources, like parish registers). We will also document the regional occupational structure of the Polish lands in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century and its evolution during the nineteenth century, up to the first Polish national census after WWI, in 1918 (on regional level). We will present results for three different territories: (1) contemporary borders; (2) interwar borders and (3) the territory continuously inhabited by thePolish ethnic majority (i.e. the territory of the Duchy of Warsaw and Austrian Western Galicia (then the German province of Posen, the Russian Congress Kingdom of Poland and Austrian Western Galicia).
The occupational structure of the Polish lands at the beginning of the period was typical for a late feudal, agricultural economy. After century, before the outbreak of WWI it was similar to the labour structures of other European and non-European industrializing peripheries (like Spain and Japan). The results will be presented on an aggregate PSTI level, as well as in more disaggregated form. (Show less)

Carmen Sarasua : More Industrial than once thought. Occupational Structure in Eighteenth Century Spain
In this paper I use the individual declarations by householders of the Cadaster of Ensenada( 1750-1755) to calculate participation rates for women and men of 22 localities of mid eighteenth century Spain, a total of 44.484 individuals. The source also allows for an analysis of the occupational structure, and shows ... (Show more)
In this paper I use the individual declarations by householders of the Cadaster of Ensenada( 1750-1755) to calculate participation rates for women and men of 22 localities of mid eighteenth century Spain, a total of 44.484 individuals. The source also allows for an analysis of the occupational structure, and shows women concentrated in manufacturing, particularly textiles, and domestic service, and men in agriculture and sheep husbandry. Taking women's work into account changes the traditional image of the region's economy as based on farming and sheep husbandry. It also challenges the conventional vision of a high percentage of the labour force in non-agricultural occupations as reflecting structural change and economic modernization. In eighteenth century inland Spain, as in many other European regions, manufacturing and service sectors employed a high percentage of the labour force without a anterior urbanization and technological revolution, reflecting the importance of labour-intensive manufactures and low labour productivity. The paper concludes that both men’s and women's occupational structure must be studied to understand when, where, why and how structural change happened. (Show less)