To bring together scholars who explain historical phenomena using the methods of the social sciences

Programme

Wed 4 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 5 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30
    19.00 - 20.15
    20.30 - 22.00

Fri 6 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 7 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.00 - 17.00

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Wednesday 4 April 2018 8.30 - 10.30
K-1 - ECO04 : Comparative Historical Analyses of Economic, Occupational, and Geographical Change in Europe, Latin America, and Canada
PFC/02/011 Sir Peter Froggatt Centre
Network: Economic History Chair: Leigh Shaw-Taylor
Organizer: Keith SugdenDiscussant: Carmen Sarasua
Marc Badia-Miró , Anna Carreras-Marín : Latin America Occupational Structure: a Case Study of Chile, 1854-1907
To understand what happened with the Chilean Economic Activity Population (EAP) during the export led growth, from mid-19th century to World War I, we provide new estimates of EAP following the methodology proposed by the INCHOS (PSTI system), using the Population Censuses from several benchmarks (1854-1907), to make possible international ... (Show more)
To understand what happened with the Chilean Economic Activity Population (EAP) during the export led growth, from mid-19th century to World War I, we provide new estimates of EAP following the methodology proposed by the INCHOS (PSTI system), using the Population Censuses from several benchmarks (1854-1907), to make possible international comparisons in the long run. We also discuss the results obtained in previous works (Wagner, 1992), identifying possible discrepancies and similitudes, with the objective of better understand what happened with the occupation structure before the War of the Pacific, during wheat and the copper export cycle, and during the expansion of the nitrate cycle at the end of the 19th century, when the export led growth was intense. We plan to add more Latin American data in the future in order to include this region in a broader international framework. (Show less)

M. Erdem Kabadayi , Uygar Karaca : A Comparative Analysis of Regional Economic Development and Urbanisation in Southeast Europe and West Anatolia, 1840-2000
We propose a paper based upon a spatiotemporal analysis of regional economic development focusing on five regions in today’s Bulgaria (Plovdiv and Ruse) and Turkey (Ankara, Bursa, and Manisa). We rely on two sets of sources: Ottoman tax and population registers from the mid-nineteenth century, and national population censuses of ... (Show more)
We propose a paper based upon a spatiotemporal analysis of regional economic development focusing on five regions in today’s Bulgaria (Plovdiv and Ruse) and Turkey (Ankara, Bursa, and Manisa). We rely on two sets of sources: Ottoman tax and population registers from the mid-nineteenth century, and national population censuses of Bulgaria and Turkey for the period 1881/1927 - 2000.
First, we would like to analyse the micro level occupational data, extracted from the 1845 Ottoman tax survey and coded into PSTI, for chosen five regions on three levels: urban centres, smaller towns, and samples of villages. Secondly we will analyse hitherto unutilized micro level, household based, Ottoman proto population censuses from the mid-nineteenth century for the same locations to assess the demographic coverage of 1845 tax survey. The inclusion of Ottoman population registers will also enable us to assess the role of migration in the make-up of population in chosen locations. After aggregating the acquired data on occupational structure, population density and migration to the level of sub-districts we will map the economic and population geography of in total around 50 sub-districts in three provinces by using advanced GIS applications including digital elevation models. Secondly for the same sub-districts we will extract, code, and map compatible data on occupational structure and population for around five cross-sections using national censuses for the 20th century. Lastly, we will compare and contrast the trajectories of economic development and urban growth of these five regions both with each other and with the national ones. By adding geo-spatial analysis into our inquiry we would like to include role of environmental factors in regional development in Southeast Europe and West Anatolia for the period 1850 to 2000. (Show less)

Keith Sugden , Sebastian Keibek & Leigh Shaw-Taylor : Adam Smith Revisited: the Importance of Coal to the Location of the Woollen Manufacture in England Before Mechanization, c. 1500-1800
Keith Sugden [ks558@cam.ac.uk] and Sebastian Keibek, University of Cambridge.

There is an extensive literature to show the importance of the cotton manufacture and of coal to the industrial revolution in England, 1780-1850. The latter was made possible by mechanical energy derived from coal. Cotton was the prominent textile manufacture from ... (Show more)
Keith Sugden [ks558@cam.ac.uk] and Sebastian Keibek, University of Cambridge.

There is an extensive literature to show the importance of the cotton manufacture and of coal to the industrial revolution in England, 1780-1850. The latter was made possible by mechanical energy derived from coal. Cotton was the prominent textile manufacture from the late eighteenth/early nineteenth centuries onwards, but previously the wool cloth industry was the staple manufacture of the English economy. Eighteenth-century commentators recognized the importance of coal in the textile de-industrialization of southern counties of England as the industry moved to the north. The topic, however, has received little attention from historians. This paper redresses this paucity of academic study and uses several male occupational sources, circa 1500-1820, to show that the wool industry relocated to the coal field several decades or more before steam power was introduced into the industry. The timing of the onset of the shift coincides with the decline in the availability of wood fuel, and the rise in the cost living in southern counties. The shortage of fuel necessary to warm the weaving room necessitated the adoption of an alternative, cheap fuel. Such fuel in the form of coal was not available in the south because of the prohibitive transport coats. Consequently, the industry moved to locate to the low wage economies in the north, where the cheapest coal fuel was available. (Show less)

Roger Sugden : Economic Development and the Long Run Occupational Structure of Canada, British Columbia, and the Okanagan, British Columbia, 1881 - 2011
Ross Hickey, Roger Sugden [roger.sugden@ubc.ca], University of British Columbia, and Keith Sugden, University of Cambridge.

The Okanagan in British Columbia is one of the major entrepreneurial regions of Canada. The principal city, Kelowna, has grown to become the province’s largest metropolitan area outside of Vancouver and Victoria, its fastest growing city, ... (Show more)
Ross Hickey, Roger Sugden [roger.sugden@ubc.ca], University of British Columbia, and Keith Sugden, University of Cambridge.

The Okanagan in British Columbia is one of the major entrepreneurial regions of Canada. The principal city, Kelowna, has grown to become the province’s largest metropolitan area outside of Vancouver and Victoria, its fastest growing city, and the fifth fastest in Canada. Today, Kelowna has a population exceeding 125,000. In 1881, it didn’t exist. We consider the Okanagan - and its rural communities and urban settlements - as a case study about how the occupational structure of economies has transitioned over time. Our analysis is based upon quantitative data from the Canadian censuses, 1881-2001, and the Canadian National Household Survey, 2011, following INCHOS methodology (coded to PSTI). To place findings in a comparative setting, we consider the occupational structure of the Okanagan, the interior of British Columbia, the province, and the country. Specifically, we are interested in the long-run changes in regional economic activity that are reflected in changes in the types of labour being used, and in the long-run transition from primarily agricultural to primarily service activity. We advocate the value of regional analysis of Canada because it is widely accepted that provincial, regional, and local differences are very marked across the country. Our work is unusual because we consider the non-metropolitan region, whereas previous research has typically studied Canada’s economic history at the sub-national level using the province or city as the unit of analysis. Our approach is novel because we start by describing occupational change in a consistent manner over time, so as to learn what questions emerge, as opposed to answering a question that is motivated by, say, economic theory. As such our work is deliberately exploratory. (Show less)