To bring together scholars who explain historical phenomena using the methods of the social sciences

Preliminary Programme

Wed 4 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Thu 5 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Fri 6 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

Sat 7 April
    8.30 - 10.30
    11.00 - 13.00
    14.00 - 16.00
    16.30 - 18.30

All days
Go back

Wednesday 4 April 2018 11.00 - 13.00
J-2 - URB02 : Shaping the City
MST/OG/010 Main Site Tower
Network: Urban Chair: David Do Paço
Organizers: -Discussants: -
Ros Costelo : Constructing the Ideal City: Public Works and Spain´s Sanitation Policy in the Philippines in the Nineteenth Century
Nineteenth century Philippines is characterized by a significant increase in the attempts of Spain to bring in the forces of modernization to one of its last colonies in the Pacific. In 1866, a new colonial institution was even created in the Philippines to administer the construction of public works (e.g. ... (Show more)
Nineteenth century Philippines is characterized by a significant increase in the attempts of Spain to bring in the forces of modernization to one of its last colonies in the Pacific. In 1866, a new colonial institution was even created in the Philippines to administer the construction of public works (e.g. waterworks system, sewage, roads, etc.). This institution was the Inspección General de Obras Públicas de Filipinas. Many of the public works were projects that intended to solve the problems and challenges of an urbanizing Manila, the colony´s capital.

Using primary sources in the archives in Spain and the Philippines, this paper seeks to answer the following questions. How did the public works in the nineteenth century reflect the Spanish colonial policy of spatial lay-out, sanitation, public health, and social control? How did these projects reflect the colonizer´s ideas of urbanization and space? Finally, how did the colonial public works became sites of contention and negotiation between the colonizer and the colonized. (Show less)

Carlos Hernández Quero , Rubén Pallol Trigueros : From the Edge. Urban Growth, Social Transformation and New Political Attitudes in Madrid, 1850-1936
The intense urban growth displayed during the industrial era was accompanied by a reconfiguration of both formal and informal boundaries that shaped the cities. As historians, those new spatial limits are especially important for accomplishing a firm grasp of the political identities and practices tied to the liberal revolution and ... (Show more)
The intense urban growth displayed during the industrial era was accompanied by a reconfiguration of both formal and informal boundaries that shaped the cities. As historians, those new spatial limits are especially important for accomplishing a firm grasp of the political identities and practices tied to the liberal revolution and to the making of democracy.

At first, due to the fact that the establishment of liberalism meant a re-negotiation of who were the political subjects that made up the city and who were legally accepted in its political community.

Secondly, in order to enhance public management and social control, cities were divided into administrative segments while at the same time the urban space was being socially and culturally split in increasingly segregated neighbourhoods and quarters. Both divisions drew different geographies of the city. On the one hand, the city designed by urban authorities. On the other hand, the city that citizens experienced in their everyday life. These divisions played a significant role in the way political actors tried to mobilise the people and made efforts to create solid sources of social support.

Thirdly, urban boundaries were relevant because of the unsettled relationship between the territories ruled by the City Council and the areas beyond its limits. Those areas were suitable spaces for the emergence of new social behaviours, cultural attitudes and political strategies and, as a consequence, they were a cause of concern for urban authorities that feared the eruption of a red belt of working-class suburbia.

The aim of this paper is to address the complex connections between boundaries, social transformation and new political identities and identities through the case study of Madrid and its surroundings (1850-1936). We will use statistical data from the municipal register of inhabitants, electoral information, judicial récords, city management documentation and daily newspapers. Our conclussions will be compared with similar phenomena that occurred in other european cities.

The paper will include a reflection on the nature of classical spaces of the urban edge (such as suburbs and working-class neighbourhoods) in a modern city and a reflection on how an in-depth knowledge about social interactions in urban space may help us to understand and describe accurately the birth, erosion, conflict and change among political cultures. (Show less)

Mathias Lerch , Lisa Stegemann : Urban Growth in International Perspective: the Case of Industrializing Zurich 1760–1949
The demographic sources of city growth in historical and contemporary developing settings remain poorly documented, in particular the role played by international migration and the interactions between migration and natural increase. We analyze annual trends in natural increase and net migration in 1836-1949 of the total population of Zurich, as ... (Show more)
The demographic sources of city growth in historical and contemporary developing settings remain poorly documented, in particular the role played by international migration and the interactions between migration and natural increase. We analyze annual trends in natural increase and net migration in 1836-1949 of the total population of Zurich, as well as of the local, other Swiss and foreigner subpopulations. The temporal change in total city growth is decomposed according to the variations in group-specific demographic behaviors and in the composition of the population. Results challenge demographic theories that attribute a predominant role to natural increase in city growth. Natural increase was positive only because of migrants’ contribution. Zurich grew essentially through migration. Yet the geographical source of migrants (internal/international) changed dramatically over time, reflecting the city’s discontinuous socioeconomic development (relative to overseas destinations), the expansion of transport networks, as well as changes in migration policy. (Show less)

Mika Mäkelä : Urban Renewal of Helsinki´s Kallio District between the 1930s and 1980s
This paper explores the urban renewal taken place after World War II in the district of Kallio in Helsinki – the demolition and new construction of the old wooden house worker’s residence district.

The main actors in the renewal process were city of Helsinki building multiple bureaus and Helsinki City ... (Show more)
This paper explores the urban renewal taken place after World War II in the district of Kallio in Helsinki – the demolition and new construction of the old wooden house worker’s residence district.

The main actors in the renewal process were city of Helsinki building multiple bureaus and Helsinki City Theatre (1964), public organisations building offices, headquarters and flats as well as construction companies developing their plots. In my paper, I will analyse the importance of the different actors in the renewal and the actors connections to each other. I will also analyse how the authority of the ruling communal parties affected the renewal process.

Another point of view is to analyse the influence that the neighbouring country Sweden had in the city planning and especially city renewal in Finland. What were the Swedish models for renewal of the city and how was this implicated in the district of Kallio? I will also analyse the relations between the Finnish and Swedish architects. In addition, the paper will explain the Finnish features in the city renewal using Kallio district as an example. (Show less)